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    From a member of Labour International currently living in California As a Brit in the US, in common with most other Brits here, the US health “care” system (actually, profit-making industry – health is an occasional by-product which is nice, but not essential) is one of the most shocking, awful, unequal and frankly disgraceful aspects of life in the US. There is the obvious aspect which most Brits are aware of – people that simply cannot afford to get medical assistance.  About 50 million people. But, there are so many other sociological aspects of this system with subtle impacts which you […]
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    With the number of Americans over the age of 65 expected to double by 2030, both the ageing of the baby boomer generation and the life-extending effects of modern medicine are becoming increasingly tangible. Yet, as Americans grow older, the number of physicians, nurses, and direct-care workers specifically trained in geriatrics is declining. From a healthcare perspective, this trend is especially troubling because the elderly require more specialized and a greater degree of care. This emerging crisis in geriatric healthcare is a complex one; like the more general healthcare system, elder care evolves out of the relationship between patients and […]
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    Economics of healthcare in England The UK spends 9.6% of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on healthcare . The NHS accounts for 87% of all health expenditure in the UK, with private health insurance (which covers 12% of the population) accounting for 1% of health expenditure, and some paying out of pocket. The NHS budget of £108.9 billion is funded through 90.3% general taxation revenues; 8.4% from National Insurance contributions (which both employer and employee make); and 1.3% from patient charges such as prescriptions (88% of prescription users are exempt from the charge) and dental charges. Spending on primary care by […]
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    It has become de rigueur on the left to regard the US healthcare system as the very incarnation of evil and therefore a country from which nothing of value can be learned for improving our NHS.  This might be about to change. There is now growing interest in the notion of the ‘Accountable Care Organisation’ (ACO) – or as it is tending to be termed over here, the Accountable Integrated Care System. The Accountable Care Organisation concept is gathering pace in the US following the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which included a pilot programme to explore ACO structures […]
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