Tag Archives: sugar

Just under one in ten children in England are obese by the time they begin primary school. The same NHS figures which highlight this statistic (9.1 per cent) among reception age pupils also pinpoints a stark rise in the issue by the end of primary school. By the time 11-year-olds are ready to move on to secondary school, 19.1 per cent are classed as obese and about a third – 33.2 per cent – are either overweight or obese. Those figures are clearly a cause for concern. As Public Health England notes, these children are also more likely to miss […]
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Should the Government Consider a U-turn? The public health field is never short of controversies. On 22nd October 2015, Public Health England (PHE) published a report on Sugar Reduction: The Evidence for Action. The report recommends inter alia, an introduction of a sugar tax of between 10% and 20% on high sugar products such as soft drinks (PHE, 2015b). This has sparked endless debates within the academic and public domains. The vociferous debate sustains when subsequently, the government guarantees that there will be no tax imposition on sugary products, whilst insisting that there are other workable alternatives for tackling health issues, […]
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Fizzy drink companies should put child-friendly labels on the front of their products spelling out the sugar content in teaspoons, in a bid to beat tooth decay and child obesity. The Local Government Association (LGA), which represents more than 370 councils – with responsibility for public health – says many youngsters and parents are unaware of the high level of sugar in fizzy drinks. The call, which comes ahead of the Government’s forthcoming child obesity strategy, follows research that shows some energy and sports drinks have 20 teaspoons of sugar in a 500 ml can – more than three times the […]
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New research from Give Up Loving Pop reveals the dangerously high levels of sugar in ‘breakfast drinks’. 18 out of 20 breakfast drinks surveyed contain very high levels of sugar (>13.5g/portion or >11.25g/100ml) contributing to tooth decay, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. Products such as Fuel 10k’s Chocolate Breakfast Milk Drink are slipping under the radar despite containing only three grams of sugar less than a standard can of Coca-Cola. The ‘breakfast in a bottle’ concept- which includes products such as Fuel 10k, Weetabix On The Go and Up&Go- is challenging the existing breakfast market, and has rapidly […]
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Public Health England’s report ‘Sugar Reduction: the Evidence for Action‘ has, rather unexpectedly been released. The report sets out a range of tough policies that need to be taken to reduce the consumption of sugary foods and drinks that are fuelling the obesity crisis. The report makes eight key recommendations: Reduce and rebalance the number and type of price promotions in all retail outlets including supermarkets and convenience stores and the out-of-home sector (including restaurants, cafes and takeaways). Significantly reduce opportunities to market and advertise high-sugar food and drink products to children and adults across all media including digital platforms […]
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As a campaigner for a healthier Britain, I’m delighted at the focus on sugar consumption but there’s still a lot of confusion.   So much of our sugar consumption slips under the radar or is categorised as ‘good sugar’ and ‘bad sugar’.   Now the term ‘free sugar’ is being used more and more in order to more clearly educate shoppers so that they can make better choices. But what does free sugar mean? Free sugars are the added sugars we have in our diet.  That’s not just the spoonfuls of white stuff we ladle into cups of tea or sprinkle over […]
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Why fill our hospitals with vending machines and Costa coffee shops when we are fighting a massive obesity epidemic? Sally Norton is a NHS consultant, specialising in weight loss and upper gastrointestinal surgery, on a crusade to put herself out of work by promoting healthier behaviour. At last, with health secretary Jeremy Hunt’s announcement of new measures being introduced to improve the standard of food in English hospitals, we may finally see better quality food in our hospitals. These changes will see hospitals ranked according to the quality and choice of the food they serve. They will hopefully provide some […]
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In the UK, on average, 20.3% of our daily food energy comes from sugar, and although this is less than the US (20.6%) and Australia (20.5%), it’s still too much. In fact, we’re eating 6.5g more sugar a day than is recommended. So why is it so crucial that we keep our sugar intake to an absolute minimum? And what are the dangers of not adhering to these guidelines? Sugar is incredibly addictive. However, many write it off as simply ‘unhealthy’ or as an indulgence; it’s interesting to consider whether the same people would feel the same about heroin. It’s […]
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