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    Publicly funded health care spending as a share of GDP in Western European countries: George Osborne’s plans: Estimated public spending on health in the UK as a percentage of GDP,2015/16 to 2020/21: With thanks to Anita Charlesworth of the Health Foundation for her slides.  

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    …at a level considered normal in other high income countries Health care is rarely far from the UK headlines, especially today, as junior doctors go on strike. The NHS’s failings are often highlighted prominently, its successes much less so. There is a constant stream of warnings that it is running out of money and thus unaffordable. Those who never liked a tax funded system, which provides care regardless of ability to pay, continue to claim that the UK is somehow unique (it isn’t – many other countries have a similar funding system) and that it will, at some time, be […]
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    There are two competing but related health service ‘narratives’ being promoted in the immediate aftermath of the spending review. The first is that George Osborne has listened and delivered the “biggest ever commitment to the NHS since its creation”. The second is that Simon Stevens, head of NHS England, has played a blinder running rings around the Treasury and securing the money to underpin his Five Year Plan. I’m disinclined to jump on either bandwagon. And here’s why. First, however, we should welcome the fact that the Chancellor has listened to health unions, campaigners and the medical profession by front […]
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    The relationship between expenditure on health and fundamental measures of benefit is pretty weak in developed countries. The figures for some countries may be misleading, as these graphs do not include private individuals expenditure, which in some places is quite considerable.   The relationship between expenditure and benefit is even weaker for infant mortality. Expenditure on health in the USA is an order of magnitude greater than any other country,  but life expectancy is very poor. There is also a wider debate to be had about the relationship between health and economic growth and progress. If my doctor gives me […]
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