Tag Archives: Life expectancy

Introduction This is the first in a set of two blogs attempts to describe the story of health inequalities in a town and recent history, why this remains important, what a strategy might look like and how it might be framed. Blog 1 considers the story in Sheffield to date, framing, context and language, the impact of systematic strategy. Blog 2 will cover general approach to intervention and specific actions or interventions we should implement. Blog 3 will cover the perspectives of two jobbing GPs working at the sharp end of this Blog 4 will cover some thoughts on where […]
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The first English Life Table was based on data collected around the census year of 1841 and gave female life expectancy as 42 and male as 40.[1] By the sixth table, in 1891, life expectancy for women in England and Wales was 48 and for men 44. Many people lived longer than this, but so many babies died in their first year of life that it brought the average down. Public health reforms during the 1890s meant that by 1901 life expectancy was 52 for women and 48 for men.[2] Four years each, gained in just ten years. The turn of […]
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WHAT THE MAP PLOTS The life expectancy at birth of those living within a 200m radius of each London Underground, London Overground and Docklands Light Railway (DLR) station The rank of each London ward on the spectrum of Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index The full map

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The NHS is important, providing treatment, relief and care in time of need, but no-one can claim it is responsible for more than 50% at the maximum of increased life expectancy. So it follows that many other things need to be addressed too, to improve health and well-being especially of those with the worst health chances. All the old public health targets as well as a few more – poverty, unemployment, poor nutrition, dangerous work, over-work, bad housing, air pollution, poor education, fear for today and fear for the future, insecurity, helplessness, hopelessness. and lack of access to knowledge about […]
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