Tag Archives: #juniordoctors

The defeat of the junior doctors was ignominious, and made worse by a failed legal challenge to the Secretary of State’s right to impose a contract. As the dispute collapsed, senior members of the medical Royal Colleges, who had tried to walk a fine line between supporting junior doctors and ensuring the health service could function, began to speak(off the record) about ‘Generation Me’ – entitled young people who want lots of money but not to work hard, and feel they should have it all. Some hospital managers who noticed how much more efficient their services were when consultants delivered […]
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The main job just completed of the Junior Doctors Committee was to achieve a deal that could be put to a vote of BMA members. And that has been achieved. The terms of the ACAS brokered settlement are here. I did employment law as a special elective as part of my pre-solicitor training, whilst also regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. In addition to the intense emotions of the employer and employee, which have run high during this protracted dispute, there is a legal job to be done which is to ensure that there is an agreement which can be […]
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Dr Petra Hanson, of the University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust,  chair of the BMA West Midlands Junior Doctors Committee speaking at South Birmingham Momentum meeting 23rd April 2016 about the industrial dispute and the life of a junior doctor.

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It’s been argued that ‘both sides clearly want to avert a strike – so let’s get back around the table‘. The junior doctors are very demoralised about having to go on strike, but feel that they have been driven to it due to circumstances. I don’t think at all it can be assumed that the Government wishes to avert a strike. In public, it will need to say that a strike, particularly an ‘all out one’ is a threat to patient safety. But being objective for a moment – you could legitimately calculate a number of lost bed days on […]
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I actually feel as if I know Danny Finkelstein from his Spotify choices – not giving anything away but we share a mutual ‘like’ of a ukelele song about cleaning windows. Also, I do sometimes wonder how our Man in Pinner can get away with stripy shirts and spotty tie combos on Newsnight. It was with some incredulity that I witnessed an exchange on Twitter. But to be honest, I am often in awkward public Twitter exchanges, and invariably they appear much worse to the outsider than they actually are. Prof Liz Lightstone is well respected. That goes without saying. […]
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[This blogpost was updated in light of developments on 2 April 2016.] Illegitimi non carborundum is a mock-Latin aphorism meaning “Don’t let the bastards grind you down”. According to Wikipedia: “The phrase originated during World War II. Lexicographer Eric Partridge attributes it to British army intelligence very early in the war (using the plural dative/ablative illegitimis). The phrase was adopted by US Army General “Vinegar” Joe Stillwell as his motto during the war. It was later further popularized in the US by 1964 presidential candidate Barry Goldwater.” It just happens at this very moment in time that Presidents of two […]
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1. The government has misrepresented data and continues to lie about the 7 day NHS. A 7 day 24 hour emergency NHS already exists. Our staffing levels are already at the brink. We will damage care if we stretch 5 days elective (non-emergency services) into 7 days. We need more funding, more doctors, more nurses, more porters, lab staff and other healthcare professionals.  2. The safeguards built into this new contract are inadequate. There is a financial incentive for hospitals to overwork already tired doctors, as it is cheaper to do this and pay fines than hire extra staff (locums) to cover the large staffing […]
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Admittedly, some people appear to thrive on conflict. “No drama Obama” was known to have a “circle of people who were collaborative and nondefensive”  whereas Hillary Clinton was reported as having “a staff consumed with infighting over how to sell their candidate” Why do some organisations develop cultures where conflict is managed productively whereas others have cultures where members work against one another? In their classic work on the social psychology of organizations, Katz and Kahn (1978) observed that “. . . every aspect of organizational life that creates order and coordination of effort must overcome other tendencies to action, […]
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