Tag Archives: hospitals

NHS hospitals in England are forecasting a £2.3 billion deficit by the end of the financial year. This is a big increase from £115m in 2013-14 and £822m in 2014-15. Hospitals are calling for debt relief and bailouts. These deficits threaten plans to transform the NHS. Of the £2.14 billion devoted to implementing these plans in 2016-17, £1.8 billion is being spent on clearing deficits. This leaves just £340m to support the vision for integrated care and the promised “radical upgrade in prevention and public health”. And channelling more money to hospitals means less is available for community and mental […]
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  For years Tesco has been held up as a model to be emulated by the NHS. Sir Gerry Robinson: “I, for one, would like to see the NHS learn from and copy working practices from Tesco, in particular, which has constantly modernised to better meet the needs of its customers. Our health service could be vastly improved, made more efficient, more innovative and, crucially – in the light of what has happened at Mid Staffs and Barrow-in-Furness hospitals – safer.” Sir Paul Corrigan: “…health service should learn from supermarket chains such as Tesco, by mirroring its business model of […]
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The National Health Service (NHS) Act was promised in the Labour landslide election of 1945, passed into law in 1946, and the service itself launched in 1948: a non-contributory comprehensive service making all forms of medical, dental and nursing care, in hospitals or in the community, available free to the whole population, paid entirely from central government funding. I qualified from St. George’s Hospital in London four years later, and will retire from full-time clinical practice in 1988; the NHS allowed me to do my own work and refer my patients to the full range of specialist services during an […]
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By Leslie Hilliard 26.9.1952 Before 1948 local interest and popular support was directed almost entirely to the few large and many small voluntary hospitals.   Little or no interest was shown in the municipal hospitals owing to their Poor’Law ancestry.   It was usual for the medical profession and the public to react emotionally to the two types of hospital and give fulsome praise to the voluntaries and run down the others often without sufficient knowledge of what really went on in either type of establishment. Today in the National Health Service a new dichotomy has been substituted for the old. In […]
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