Tag Archives: general practice

The BMA have begun to ballot GPs in response to the Tower Hamlets motion passed at LMC conference in May which said: “That conference believes that the GP Forward View is failing to deliver the resources necessary to sustain general practice and demands that GPC ballot GPs as to whether they would be prepared to collectively close their lists in response to this crisis.” It is beyond doubt that General Practice is in meltdown. Despite the best efforts of GPC Executive all we have been offered is a totally inadequate GP Forward View and a couple of other sweeteners such […]
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The upcoming autumn statement on 23 November is a chance to avert the crisis in general practice. General practice is gasping for breath and is on life support machine due to plummeting investment and increasing demands. The funding for general practice in England has slumped to just 8.5% of the total NHS budget in last six years. To prevent the meltdown of the general practice, the chancellor Philip Hammond needs to take steps to increase funding in the primary care to at least 11% in his autumn statement. In the current climate, it is unsurprising that many of the next […]
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A bad few weeks for general practice. First came the MPIG scuffle in June, as the government announced unilaterally that subsidies that guaranteed general practitioners’ incomes would be phased out, over seven years. This government is no friend of a Minimal Practice Income Guarantee, which protects GPs from market discipline. The withdrawal of MPIG affects 60% of around 11,000 general practices, but in 98 mostly small rural or inner city practices it is an existential threat. The government seems to have calculated that the political fallout from all this should be manageable. The BMA has assisted by negotiating for the […]
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Motions submitted to the BMA Local Medical Committees UK Conference 2014 27 To be proposed by WILTSHIRE That conference: (i) believes that general practice is unsustainable in its current format (ii) believes that it is no longer viable for general practice to provide all patients with all NHS services free at the point of delivery (iii) urges the UK governments to define the services that can and cannot be accessed in the NHS (iv) calls on GPC to consider alternative funding mechanisms for general practice (v) calls on GPC to explore national charging for general practice services with the UK […]
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Doctors are rarely accountable for the average quality of their work in terms of outcome. They have to answer for exceptional events, unexpected disasters lying outside the normal range of experience, but rarely for assessment of average process, and virtually never for average outcome. If disasters don’t occur, or don’t reach the ears of authority, quality of work is assumed to be satisfactory. Even if it is so obviously unsatisfactory as absolutely to demand enquiry, that enquiry will use process rather than outcome measures. For example, the expected mortality of a planned operation for repair of inguinal hernia in a […]
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The National Health Service (NHS) Act was promised in the Labour landslide election of 1945, passed into law in 1946, and the service itself launched in 1948: a non-contributory comprehensive service making all forms of medical, dental and nursing care, in hospitals or in the community, available free to the whole population, paid entirely from central government funding. I qualified from St. George’s Hospital in London four years later, and will retire from full-time clinical practice in 1988; the NHS allowed me to do my own work and refer my patients to the full range of specialist services during an […]
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AUTHOR’S FOREWORD In 1977 the World Health Assembly of the United Nations agreed that: The main social target of governments and WHO in the coming decades should be the attainment by all the citizens of the world by the year 2000 of a level of health that will permit them to lead a socially and economically productive life. This was further elaborated at the WHO Alma Ata conference in 1978, with a declaration endorsed by the British govern­ment, which spelled out that this ambitious target could never be achieved by medical action alone, centred on hospitals. It depended on adoption […]
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Published by the Fabian Society NOTE.—This pamphlet, like all publications of the FABIAN SOCIETY, represents not the collec­tive view of the Society but only the view of the individual who prepared it. The responsibility of the Society is limited to approving the publications which it issues as worthy of consideration within the Labour Movement. Two shillings and sixpence I. Introduction Throughout the world the cost of modern hospital care is giving cause for alarm. Efforts are being made everywhere to reduce the length of stay in hospital and to encourage the use of the domiciliary health services. In fact, the […]
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