Tag Archives: Brexit

Healthcare and the National Health Service (NHS) budget were a key element of the Brexit referendum narrative: Vote Leave infamously promised that savings from paying into the EU budget could be spent on health, a pledge from which campaigners have since disassociated themselves. Indeed, the NHS is unlikely to benefit from Brexit – very much the contrary. Indeed, Brexit weakens the financial sustainability of the NHS. According to estimates from the King’s Fund, in 2015–16 the NHS had the largest deficit in its history. NHS funding has been unable to keep pace with a growing demand for services. These financial constrains come at a time […]
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The decision to leave the EU, and the government’s commitment to leave the Single Market and Customs Union, has led the media, academics, and politicians to use the term ‘crisis’ when articulating the number of potential implications (e.g. for the economy, citizens’ rights, and for the EU project as a whole). Less attention has been given to the management of cross-border threats within the EU, and the possible implications of Brexit for the UK’s influence on EU policy-making. This hasn’t been a matter for the early negotiations nor can it really be described as a matter that’s been given much […]
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It has been a year on since the Brexit vote and there are still lots of questions circulating as to what will be affected after Britain leaves the EU. A query that is on the minds of British travelers is regarding where the EHIC stands. For those who don’t know, The European Health Insurance Card is a medical card which can be used in the EU. It entitles you to medical cover while on your travels without the worry of paying any extra costs. If a particular country receives free treatment, then you will also get this benefit. Should anything […]
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Cheered up by last week? The last few weeks have given us a respite from a seemingly endless wave of victories by populists and the right: after a miserable 2016, we have seen the radical right narrowly defeated in the Austrian presidential election, heavily defeated in the second round of the French presidential election and in the legislative vote, in decline in Germany and locked out of government in the Netherlands. And did I mention a hung parliament in the UK? It might be nice to relax and go back to critiquing neoliberalism, but we should not. The populist radical […]
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The spectre of the Brexit has loomed heavily within the hearts of investors since it first became a reality and many firmly believed that the economy of the United Kingdom would be irreparably harmed as a result. However, this doom-and-gloom scenario has not come to pass (as of yet). The reason that this observation is significant is that Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond is soon to deliver his budget outline. What can we expect to hear, are there any surprises in store and will this news impact the overall economic outlook of the United Kingdom? Better Than Expected It […]
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The triggering of article 50 starts a period of uncertainty in our NHS. The decision is momentous, but after seven years of neglect from successive Tory governments the prime minister and health secretary must finally give the NHS and patients the certainty needed through the Brexit process. So far the complacency in government is astounding. Last week, Jeremy Hunt published the department of health’s “mandate to NHS England” to set “the government’s objectives and any requirements for NHS England”. Amazingly the 24 page document made no mention of Brexit whatsoever. And during the prime minister’s statement yesterday confirming the triggering […]
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Everyone knows that after seven years of neglect from the Conservative government, the NHS is undergoing a serious crisis of funding and staffing. The last thing needed is more uncertainty. That is exactly what the NHS faces with Brexit. On Wednesday Theresa May will trigger article 50 and later this week health bosses publish the updated Five Year Forward View. It is time for the prime minister and the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, to give the NHS and its patients the certainty needed through the Brexit process. May has already turned her back on the promise of £350m a week for […]
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The long awaited Brexit White Paper has finally appeared. The timing was, to say the least, a little unusual, as it was published the day after members of Parliament voted to initiate the process of leaving the European Union. It is, of course, normal for White Papers to be published in advance of parliamentary bills, so that parliamentarians can make an informed decision about how to vote. On this occasion, the Prime Minister had made it very clear that she was opposed to them having any vote at all. The advantage of not having a written constitution is that prime ministers […]
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Some public policies should carry health warning labels like cigarettes or uncooked meat. Certainly that is true for a reckless and ill-thought-out policy like the UK government’s current approach to leaving the European Union, after a close advisory referendum in which at least one of the campaigns would quickly have run afoul of trading standards law if had involved a consumer product. As controversy rages on about exit paths – ‘strategies’ would be too kind a word – health researchers and professionals are asking how Brexit could and will affect public health. Among the questions informed by a political economy […]
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The Murky Pro-Corporate Trade Agenda is Bad For Our Health In the run-up to the EU referendum, discussion of the threat posed by the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) to the NHS and Britain’s wider public sector moved from the shade of the NGOs and think-tanks, through the Overton window, and out into the fresh air of public debate. Important but arcane issues were discussed, such as how TTIP’s procurement rules would force the NHS to contract out services, and the new rights afforded to private health companies to sue Britain for national public health policies that could harm […]
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The English trusts that depend most on EU nurses  Rachel Marangozov and Matthew Williams explain why some parts of the NHS have become increasingly dependent on the EU migrant workforce and look at the implications of Brexit on recruitment. With ongoing shortages and so many nurses due to retire over the next decade, the government needs to act now to ensure we have enough nursing staff. The composition of the overseas nursing workforce has shifted dramatically in recent years; nurses from the European Economic Area (EEA)[1] are now increasingly prevalent, reflecting a change in recruitment practices due to tighter immigration rules, fewer […]
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The principal institutions of the EU are: Commission: proposes legislation, implements laws, upholds the treaties; It is appointed by the 28 governments, and is accountable to Parliament. Parliament: scrutinises proposals, amends and passes legislation, holds Commission to account; It is directly elected by the adult population. Council: protects rights of Member States, amends and passes legislation. Court of Justice: interprets the treaties, defines the meaning of laws What sort of “Brexit” is proposed? Article 50 of Lisbon Treaty. preparation for a second referendum? rights of UK nationals in other Member States not guaranteed. full access to Single Market (like Norway)? partial […]
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