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    https://youtu.be/1jFWY7WmPBA

    Campaigners and Lewisham residents offer thoughts and thanks to the NHS.

    The Save Lewisham Hospital Campaign has launched a new video on the 72nd Birthday for the NHS on Sunday, 5th July 2020. The Campaign say: “In the middle of a global pandemic, with 65,000 deaths in the UK, some thanks and thoughts on the NHS 72nd birthday.”

    Happy birthday to the NHS – you were clapped but tories will not deliver the cash needed #NHSBirthday #SecondWave https://t.co/WOrG41PeDl

    — Alan Hall (@alan_ha11) July 5, 2020

    On this day, The Observer reports that the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Rushi Sunak refuses a £10 billion cash injection as Ministers have been warned that a second surge of Covid 19 infections let alone the now usual ‘winter pressures’ will leave the NHS “crippled” and “perilously unprepared”.

    The Government promised that the NHS would receive “whatever it needs” and NHS bosses claim that this pledge is to be broken now.

    Further claims that the Government’s chronic underfunding of the NHS will inevitably lead on to the fragmentation and privatisation of the NHS have been made.

    Interestingly, in the video a resident reflects by saying:

    “Stop using Covid as a cover to push through a restructuring of the NHS without public consultation.”

    Periodically, when cash has been tight in the NHS proposals surface to downgrade Lewisham Hospital’s A&E Department.

    Brian Fisher, a retired Lewisham GP, in the video says: “We continue to defend you [NHS] and fight for publicly funded social care.”

    In that spirit, Cllr Alan Hall has written to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Rishi Sunak supporting Citizen’s UK asking for social care workers to be paid the London Living Wage locally.

    You’ve clapped, now’s the time to act! 🌈

    We know that care workers deserve a real Living Wage so here’s a little reminder that you can send to your MP.

    Help care workers get a real #LivingWage by clicking the link below 👇 https://t.co/iwlaKjaPex#LivingWage4KeyWorkers

    — Citizens UK (@CitizensUK) July 5, 2020

    Time to pay care workers a London Living Wage

    Citizen’s UK say: “Careworkers have been on the frontline of the UK’s fight against COVID-19, but a Real Living Wage would put them at the heart of our economic recovery too. Increasing pay to £9.30 an hour (£10.75 in London) would enable a million low-paid workers to start spending in local businesses and communities up and down the country.”

    The text of the letter is below.

    Dear Chancellor Rt Hon Rishi Sunak MP,

    On the 72nd NHS Birthday, I am writing to you as a constituent to ask for your support for Citizens UK’s Living Wage for Careworkers Charter, which aims to ensure careworkers are paid the real Living Wage of £9.30 an hour (£10.75 in London).

    Those in the social care sector are at the frontline of the fight against Covid-19 and I know in our community so many care recipients and their families value their vital work.

    We have all been ‘clapping for carers’ on Thursday evenings in recognition of the danger they face, and yet they are often paid the minimum wage (also known as the National Living Wage) of £8.72 an hour.

    Citizens UK is calling for the UK government to invest the £1.4 billion that the Resolution Foundation estimates it would cost for every care sector worker, who delivers publicly–funded care, to be paid the real Living Wage of £9.30 per hour. This would allow careworkers to live with greater dignity and to escape from poverty pay.

    We know that the public, commissioners of social care such as local authorities, employers of care workers, and recipients of care would all like care workers to be paid the real Living Wage, but to do that we need additional investment from the UK Government.

    I really hope we can also count on your support for our campaign. Please let me know whether or not we can add your name to Citizens UK’s Living Wage for Careworkers Charter, which you can find below.

    Citizens UK’s Living Wage for Careworkers Charter:

    We all rely on the one million careworkers on the frontline of the UK’s fight against the pandemic. Careworkers have worked tirelessly throughout Covid-19 to look after the most vulnerable in our society – and have found themselves at risk, often without adequate PPE, and without the esteem afforded to NHS workers.

    Over half of frontline careworkers earn below the voluntary Living Wage of £9.30 an hour (£10.75 in London) and are struggling to keep their heads above water.

    As careworkers, care recipients, care commissioners, council leaders, politicians and community leaders, we all agree that no careworker deserves poverty pay. We have applauded careworkers on Thursday evenings – now is the time to match our applause with a guarantee that they will earn enough to live a decent life.

    We call on the UK Government to provide the £1.4 billion in additional funding so that every care sector worker that delivers publicly funded care can be paid at least the voluntary Living Wage of £9.30 an hour (£10.75 in London).

    Yours sincerely,

    Cllr Alan Hall

     

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    This paper was developed by a group of primary care clinicians for the Labour Shadow Health Team at their request. We hope it helps illuminate the next steps for primary care.

    WHAT ARE THE RISKS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FACING  PRIMARY CARE PROVISION DURING AND AFTER ITS RETURN  TO A NORMAL STATE OF OPERATION?

     

    “We will be facing some tough challenges over at least the next year: managing more consultations (and clinical risk) remotely by phone or video; catching up with resurgent patient demand, catching up with the care of long-term conditions (whilst trying to protect groups of vulnerable people from a continuing threat of Covid); managing a backlog of people who need to be referred; and coping with any spikes in Covid. This comes on top of the usual (preceding) strains on limited resources and lengthening ‘winter pressures.’ I don’t think that we will be seen as ‘NHS heroes’ in a few months!”

     

    DIGITAL WORKING IS TRANSFORMING CARE

    Opportunities

    • Easier and more flexible for people and practices, so may aid GP recruitment
    • The complex and subtle nature of the consultation seems to be maintained
    • Communication across sectors can be dramatically improved. One GP described helping a patient with lymphoma – in 10mins he was able to include a Ca nurse and consultant in a conversation with the patient.
    • Telephone triage also successful
    • Bricks and mortar general practice may become less necessary
    • Combining online personalised advice with online access to records opens the way to improved self-care

    Challenges:

    • Digital can widen inequalities and disenfranchise. Experience suggests it is the elderly rather than the poor who struggle the most.
    • The best balance between remote and face-to-face is unclear. Video may be best for follow-ups.
    • Video is seldom preferred by people. The telephone or face to face are most popular.

    Actions:

    • Support the elderly to become more digitally able while ensuring that traditional approaches remain available
    • Support digital cross-sector working: GP/hospital/Social Care
    • Encourage digital mentoring to improve self-care for people with LTCs

     

    SHIFTING TO PROACTIVE WORK WITH COMMUNITIES

    Opportunities

    • The spontaneous rise in mutual community organisations has been remarkable, often outwith the traditional voluntary sector, improving safeguarding and perhaps saving lives.
    • Primary care has been able to embrace that.
    • It offers a model for the future
    • There have been many examples of successful cooperation with communities, but they have been dependent on local circumstances and local heroes.
    • The health gain comes when communities can take more control over the area and their lives
    • The NHS and local government need to create the conditions whereby communities can work collaboratively with the statutory sector sharing decisions with their communities. We need a systematic approach for mobilising civil society, working with NHS and LAs.
    • PCNs offer a good base for such cross-sector working

    Challenges:

    • Sharing decisions with communities is a difficult skill the NHS would have to learn, perhaps from LAs and housing associations.
    • Building on existing work and with councillors would be essential. No new unnecessary initiatives.

    Actions:

    • Jointly fund, via NHS and LA, community development workers in each PCN, working with social prescribers. They would support the statutory sector sharing decisions with their communities.
    • Primary Care to be encouraged to support community groups and community development by, for instance, enabling practice space to be used by communities.
    • Asset mapping with LA and PH colleagues would be one early step
    • Encourage and incentivise cross-sector working.

     

    PRIMARY CARE TO ACTIVELY WORK ON THE SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH AND HEALTH INEQUALITIES

    These have been thrown into sharp relief through the pandemic.

    Opportunities

    • Essential to make any progress on health improvement
    • Community development can assist
    • Local work on poverty, race issues, migrant issues, housing
    • Cross-sector working is essential to do this.

    Challenges

    • The independent contractor status of general practice may hinder this process.
    • Cross-sector working is difficult
    • It is political work

    Actions

    • Promote training GPs with a Special Interest in Public Health, sitting astride the PCN and LA
    • Support areas to become Marmot towns.
    • PCNs to link formally with LAs
    • Boost the status and effectiveness of Well-Being Boards
    • Borough-level linking (not merging) of LAs and NHS.

     

    PRIMARY CARE AND LONG-TERM CONDITIONS INC COVID

    Opportunities

    • The importance of community service provision has been made plain by the pandemic
    • Extensive primary care services and rehab re likely to be required for people recovering from Covid

    Challenges

    • Managing more serious illnesses outside hospital may require differently trained primary care staff such as District Nurses

    Actions:

    • Use a range of approaches to contact those who have delayed seeking help for potentially life-threatening illnesses
    • Digital self-care with remote links to home monitoring such as BP, weight, Peak Flows
    • Secondary care doing remote consultations to reduce the backlog
    • Explore a range of differently skilled staff for primary care

     

    RELAXATION OF RULES HAS BEEN HELPFUL

    Opportunities  

    • There has been relaxation of some bureaucracy
    • Flexible approaches have enabled doctors to return to the workforce.
    • These changes have enabled GPs to devote more time to patient care.

    Challenges

    • Some of this bureaucracy is useful. We don’t want wholesale deregulation: that has often been dangerous
    • It is difficult to know which parts need to be kept and which don’t.

    Actions

    • Explore with the profession which regulatory aspects need to be kept and which don’t.

     

    FUNDING, TRAINING AND STAFFING

    Challenges

    • Primary care, GPs, HVs and DNs remain substantially understaffed. This must change.
    • Different training requirements may be needed for a different future.
    • The RCN is calling for wage increases for nurses

    Actions:

    • A system to support on-going review and remodelling of workforce capacity is needed to ensure that the primary care workforce is responsive to emerging need which may increase over time.
    • Clarification of plans for student health visitors and others who have had their training disrupted during the pandemic

     

    STAFF SAFETY IN THE TIME OF COVID

    • Continued need for PPE to protect staff and patients
    • Mental health support for staff

     

    PRIMARY CARE BUILDINGS

    Challenges:

    • Many primary care buildings were inadequate before Covid
    • Many more now need redesign to cope with new patient flows and requirements for cleaning etc

    Actions:

    • Funding must be found where premises need improving
    • Consider links with housing associations

     

    BOOSTING DEMOCRACY IN THE NHS

    Challenges

    • The NHS has used the Coronavirus Act to push through significant changes to the infrastructure of ICSs. This is baking in the risks posed by them: privatisation, fragmentation and cuts.
    • Hosp reconfigurations are happening rapidly without consultation and no equality assessment

    Actions

    • Call out these dangerous changes and use them to explore new approaches to democracy. For instance:
      • PCNs run with a Board with a broad representation of opinion
      • Link PCNs and local government through local forums with budgets – a form of participatory budgeting
      • Community development would assist participatory democracy

     

    ADVANCED CARE PLANNING

    Opportunities

    • Advanced care planning will need to sensitively change for the better.
    • General practice is well- placed to have discussions that allow patients to express their wishes, which will reduce unnecessary and possibly undignified hospital admissions.

    Challenges

    • There seemed to be sporadic inappropriate behaviour from CCGs and practices issuing blanket DNR notices to care homes
    • The pandemic seemed to cast a harsh light on relationships between some practices and care homes

    Actions:

    • Patients suitable for advanced care planning conversations could be identified— perhaps informed by frailty scores — and discussed in multidisciplinary meetings as part of routine care.
    • The public need to be involved, and the sector need to emphasise that these discussions are about providing quality of care.

     

    SOURCES:

    https://www.rcn.org.uk/news-and-events/blogs/covid-19-out-of-this-crisis-we-must-build-a-better-future-for-nursing

     

    https://ihv.org.uk/our-work/publications-reports/health-visiting-during-covid-19-an-ihv-report/

     

    A brave new world: the new normal for general practice after the COVID-19 pandemic.

    https://bjgpopen.org/content/early/2020/06/01/bjgpopen20X101103

     

    https://www.rcgp.org.uk/policy/fit-for-the-future.aspx

     

    CONTRIBUTORS

    Dr Onkar Sahota

    Dr Duncan Parker

    Dr Joe McManners

    Dr Robbie Foy

    Dr Brian Fisher

     

    CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

    Dr Fisher:

    I am Clinical Director of a software company called Evergreen Life www.evergreen-life.co.uk . We are accredited by the NHS to enable people to access for free online their GP records, to book appointments and order repeat prescriptions. We try to help people stay as fit and well as possible.

    Leave a comment

    Class and race are the biggest factors in determining those that have died or been taken ill by Covid-19, Unite, Britain and Ireland’s largest union, said today (Tuesday 2 June).

    Unite called for a raft of policies to tackle the ‘systemic failures’ that has led to the disproportionate death toll amongst the Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities and also the poorest groups in society

    The union was commenting on Public Health England’s report Disparities in the risk and outcomes of Covid-19 which highlighted those groups that had been hardest hit in terms of mortality due to coronavirus.

    Unite assistant general secretary Gail Cartmail said: “This report shines a searing light that reveals the pandemic in the UK is intrinsically linked disproportionately to class and race.

    “These wide disparities are detailed in this data and point to age, race and income and accompanying health inequalities as key determinants as to whom has been the worst affected by Covid-19.

    “This has been amplified among those in undervalued occupations and jobs where zero hours’ contracts and precarious employment are the norm.

    “Working hard to provide for your families is no defence against Covid-19 for these groups – these systemic failures need to be tackled urgently and that work should start now.

    “No one policy size fits all, but such an agenda should include ethnically sensitive risk assessments and income guarantees for workers who through ‘test, track and trace’ would otherwise be reliant on statutory sick pay (SSP), while in isolation.

    “The Real Living Wage should be the basic minimum for those in ‘at risk’ occupations as an interim measure, with a commitment to sectoral bargaining for care workers and the guarantee of the necessary funding.

    “All these measures are achievable with government support. If austerity is over, as ministers claim, the best defence against the inequalities which the report exposes is to narrow the income gap and invest in public services with priority to social care.

    “The pandemic has shown that the crisis in social care can no long be pushed into the political long grass. The lack of testing for residents and staff, and also the shortage of PPE, in care homes has wreaked a terrible toll on the elderly who have died in their thousands due to Covid-19.

    “Social care can no longer be regarded as the poor relation when it comes to funding from the budgets of central and local government – a ministerial blueprint for social care should be a top priority as we emerge from the lockdown.

    “Poverty is the parent of disease and Covid-19 has been a willing accomplice in this respect. Once this pandemic has passed, we need to look as a country anew to how we can recalibrate economic and social policies to create a fairer society.

    “All these issues must be investigated in depth when the post-pandemic public inquiry takes place, which will be needed in the interests of accountability, openness and transparency.”

    The PHE report said that those parts of UK society most affected included the elderly; Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) populations generally and those BAME NHS staff on the frontline in particular; those with underlying conditions, such as diabetes and dementia; those living in care homes; and those from deprived communities.

    Twitter: @unitetheunion

    Facebook: unitetheunion1

    Web: unitetheunion.org

    Unite is Britain and Ireland’s largest union with members working across all sectors of the economy. The general secretary is Len McCluskey.

     

     

    1 Comment

    This is a collective statement on behalf of SHA bringing together public health evidence and other opinions on a key Covid policy issue.

    The Westminster Government announced on May 10th that:

    “As a result of the huge efforts everyone has made to adhere to strict social distancing measures, the transmission rate of coronavirus has decreased. We therefore anticipate, with further progress, that we may be able, from the week commencing 1 June, to welcome back more children to early years, school, and further education settings. We will only do this provided that the five key tests set by the government justify the changes at the time, including that the rate of infection is decreasing. As a result, we are asking schools, colleges, and childcare providers to plan on this basis, ahead of confirmation that these tests are met”

    We believe that the 5 tests will not be fully met by June 1st and that this announcement was premature. This decision has been taken without transparency about the evidence that has been used on the direct and indirect health impacts. We now see French schools having to reclose.

    We also believe that the Government should have attempted to agree a consensus with Local Authorities and Teaching Unions before announcing a country wide directive around schools in general. The announcement has left schools without clear expectations, without a structure for managing this. We understand that many Local Authorities and schools will now have to seek the skills and information to figure this all out themselves. We believe that this uncertainly will lead to decisions that could adversely affect the health of children, teachers, families, and vulnerable people in their communities. We do not want a repeat of the mistakes in respect of care homes.

    In addition, it breaks the consensus across the four nations in the UK and shows little regard for regional variation or for impacts on inequities in health outcomes for everyone, and educational outcomes for children. Educational opportunities are a powerful determinant of long-term health outcomes.

    The SHA believes that the education sector has been systematically under-resourced and discouraged by this Government since 2010 under austerity, which leaves many schools with insufficient staff, increasing class sizes and inadequate environments that are less able to meet the stringent conditions to enable them to open as safely as possible in such a short timescale.

    We believe that the Government should have considered the following:

    1. How risks would be minimised, and benefits maximised:
      1. In the school environment, such as through safe distancing, handwashing, and other logistic measures to minimise transmission of COVID19, where staffing levels may not be sufficient and school buildings are not always suitable. Children use their bodies to learn.
      2. To children, in particular those in deprived neighbourhoods, in vulnerable groups, children from BAME families, and those with special needs. There is no clarity on alternative arrangements that could have been much more robust to safeguard, and to ensure their nutrition, learning and emotional needs. This should not rely on schools to provide these solutions now
      3. Allowing for the full autonomy of schools and their local authorities within their safeguarding obligations on an area basis
      4. To other groups, such as teachers, communities, and vulnerable groups, and weigh these against the benefits and risks to the wider society
    1. How harm would be minimised, and benefits maximised:
      1. To children who may be missing education which is likely to have a long-term impact on those from more deprived neighbourhoods and those who are less likely to have received equitable support at home
      2. To children who become infected, including asymptomatically and to their immediate household and contacts
      3. To the wider community, especially those that have had a high incidence of COVID19 and remain at high risk of further outbreaks and resurgences. These have disproportionately affected more deprived communities and those with a high proportion of BAME people
    2. How the overall public health response would support this move:
      1. How potential school outbreaks would be identified and managed in the absence of a fully functioning test/ treat/ isolate programme, particularly as some businesses are reopening at the same time.
      2. How schools will be supported by local public health services unless further resources and decision-making powers are decentralised to allow a robust and appropriate and rapid local multi-agency response

    The SHA believes that this decision has been reached without a clear rationale on the benefits and risks, and without demonstrating that the 5 key tests have been met:

    Test one: Making sure the NHS can cope

    Test two: A ‘sustained and consistent’ fall in the daily death rate

    Test three: Rate of infection decreasing to ‘manageable levels’

    Fourth test: Ensuring supply of tests and PPE can meet future demand

    Fifth test: Being confident any adjustments would not risk a second peak that would overwhelm the NHS

    We would add a Sixth: A fully functioning test/ treat/ isolate programme

    The SHA believes that the decision has been reached without sufficient consultation with key stakeholders and before the 5 tests have been fully met. In addition, the National Education Union has set 5 tests specific to educational settings, and we support their belief that in many areas these have not been met.

    We expect a more supportive response from the Dept for Education including investment into online learning and into a revived Sure Start model.

    The SHA believes that schools should be reopened at the right time but that the Government should make the best efforts to ensure that there is a consensus for when this should happen based upon relevant expert input rather than political pressure.  This has clearly not been achieved, as it has been in other countries that have gradually opened schools.

    We encourage Local Authorities and Academy Trusts to follow the example of LAs such as Liverpool, Haringey, North of Tyne, Hartlepool, and Brighton – and devolved governments in Wales, Scotland, and NI – in making it clear that they will not reopen schools until they feel it is safe.

    Sources

    Actions for schools during the coronavirus outbreak updated 18th May. Department of Education for England

    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-school-closures/guidance-for-schools-about-temporarily-closing

    NEU five tests for Government before schools can re-open

    https://neu.org.uk/neu-five-tests-government-schools-can-re-open

    ONS figures reveal 65 COVID-related deaths in education workforce

    https://schoolsweek.co.uk/ons-figures-reveal-65-covid-related-deaths-in-education/

    Which occupations have the highest potential exposure to the coronavirus (COVID-19)? ONS May 11th https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/articles/whichoccupationshavethehighestpotentialexposuretothecoronaviruscovid19/2020-05-11

    Coronavirus (COVID-19) related deaths by occupation, England and Wales: deaths registered up to and including 20 April 2020 May 11th https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/causesofdeath/bulletins/coronaviruscovid19relateddeathsbyoccupationenglandandwales/latest

    https://www.tes.com/news/coronavirus-doctors-back-teachers-fears-over-schools-reopening?fbclid=IwAR2JD0Np1x_lgG49xo1Hig4T9ozNto36vsG09Ue-mvAtMrTvhWVyegtphBE

    Prof John Edmunds

    https://www.theneweuropean.co.uk/top-stories/john-edmunds-tells-lords-decision-to-re-open-schools-is-political-1-6660526?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Social_Icon&utm_campaign=in_article_social_icons

    Prof Devi Shridhar, Professor of Global Public Health, Edinburgh Uni &  Ines Hassan.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/may/20/british-schools-science-children-education-testing-tracing

    https://www.newschain.uk/news/young-children-will-still-socially-distance-school-health-chief-says-8334

    Schools re-close in France after 70 new Covid cases following re-opening  6-11yr classes. NB. French schools starting age is 6 not 3.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/coronavirus-france-school-cases-reopen-lockdown-a9520386.html

    Comparative school age starts

    https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.PRM.AGES

    NB. Denmark is also 6 and easier to manage s/d. long term impacts of formal learning too soon

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22029435-000-too-much-too-young-should-schooling-start-at-age-7/#

    Formal learning in early years linked to criminality in teens

    https://www.res.org.uk/resources-page/the-impact-of-school-starting-age-on-teenage-criminality–evidence-from-denmark-.html

    Posted by Brian Fisher on behalf of the Policy Team.

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    Boris Johnson’s hardline stance not to waive the £400 NHS surcharge for overseas health and social care workers combating coronavirus was described as ‘mean-spirited and shabby’ today (Thursday 21 May) by Unite, Britain and Ireland’s largest trade union.
    Unite, which has 100,000 members in the health service, said the hypocrisy of the prime minister was given extra piquancy as he singled out two non-UK  nurses – one from New Zealand and the other from Portugal – for praise after he survived his fight with Covid-19.
    The NHS fee of £400-a-year for care workers applies to those from outside the European Economic Area, regardless whether they use the NHS or not. It is set to rise to £624 in October.
    There is also controversy over the £900m figure which the prime minister told MPs is raised by this charge. The Institute of Fiscal Studies put the sum at a tenth of that – £90 million.
    Unite national officer for health Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe  said: “Of all people, Boris Johnson should appreciate the wonderful and dedicated work of NHS health and social care professions, including the two non-UK nurses he singled out for particular praise in his fight for survival against coronavirus.
    “Therefore, the fact he won’t waive this £400 fee for overseas health and social care workers is mean-spirited and shabby.
    “With this prime minister warm words of praise come cheap, but a small financial gesture for NHS migrant workers, many of them low-paid, is beyond his compass. His stance is hypocritical.
    “Tonight, we will have the Thursday ‘clap for carers by the people of the UK, many of them who voted for Boris Johnson as recently as last December – there is a big irony here. This charge should be waived immediate.”:
     
    Unite senior communications officer Shaun Noble
    Twitter: @unitetheunion Facebook: unitetheunion1 Web: unitetheunion.org
    Unite is Britain and Ireland’s largest union with members working across all sectors of the economy. The general secretary is Len McCluskey.

     

    1 Comment

    Vested interest alert – yes I’m claiming that word back – I come from a family of school staff, teachers, TAs, school governors. The dedication and hard work of all school staff, caretakers, cleaners, cooks, governors have shown for the safety, education, well-being, in many instances feeding, their pupils throughout this crisis has been extraordinary.

    I am totally dismayed at any criticism. Staff have the well being and safety of their pupils at their very heart. Their views on the total opening of schools and the views of their representatives have to be totally respected. The issue is complex. In Liverpool, the elected City Mayor has chosen not to open schools on June 1st as a safe-guarding issue as this wonderful city is still reeling from a high rate of infection. Questions are being asked as to why Mayor Joe Anderson has taken this stance when schools in Denmark, led by our sister party, are opening. Joe has never said Liverpool can’t open its schools, he has said when it’s safe to do so and only then. Each local authority has its own characteristics, not only in terms of levels of this dreadful pandemic, but the physical nature and age of its school buildings, levels of deprivation, staffing, the amount of public funding available and not available, the differing needs of its pupils. Country by country comparison is far too simplistic. This is an educational, health and societal issue.

    We all want all our children back in school and we are most worried about our most vulnerable, where home-schooling in a cramped flat with no outdoor space is stretching our children’s educational and physical and mental health well-being. I have family members with differing views – what I do know is that they are taking decisions based on local circumstances and always with the education and health of their pupils and staff foremost in their thinking. What is clear is that our health and education services, so starved of resources in this dangerous and false economy of austerity, especially in cities like Liverpool, have to be funded properly based on demographic need. I sincerely hope this Government remembers that but I fear not. Is it safe to open schools to children other than those of key workers or classed as vulnerable? There will always be risk – the question is how to reduce it. We must now learn from other countries – transmission from children to adults, children returning to schools in Italy presenting with multisystem inflammatory syndrome weeks after exposure.

    The UK did not have community testing, contact tracing and isolation early. Surely the question is are schools safe enough to open? Which means we need information and monitoring at a local level, the amount of new cases locally and rates of transmission. Local data should be driving policy and assuming a date for the entire country is ideologically rather than data driven. We need to get children back into education, but a locally managed data driven approach has to be the only way. Prioritising testing over a date. Listening to our teaching staff and our unions.

    For Liverpool in present circumstances – I’m with Joe.

    Theresa Griffin Labour MEP North West 2014-2020

    Member SHA

    1 Comment

    The nine-point blueprint by 16 health unions for reopening the NHS should act as ‘a rocket booster’ for ministers to tackle the lack of PPE and the shambolic testing regime, Unite, Britain and Ireland’s largest union, said today (Friday 15 May).

    Unite, which has 100,000 members in the health service, is one of the 16 unions that has contributed to the blueprint designed to make the NHS the safest possible environment for patients, staff and visitors as the lockdown is eased by the government, and out-patient clinics and operations resume.

    Unite said that the three key issues that needed to be addressed urgently were the continuing lack of PPE; the ‘messy’ testing regime which has seen samples sent to the USA; and the withdrawal of the threat that NHS staff could be subject to a public sector pay freeze highlighted in leaked Treasury documents.

    Unite national officer for health Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe said: “This blueprint by the health unions should act as a rocket booster for ministers to really get to grips with key elements of the pandemic.

    “A continuing shortage of PPE is a dark stain on the government’s response to the coronavirus emergency. We have ambulance, biomedical scientist, nursing and speech and language therapist (SALT) members telling us that there are still shortages and, in some cases, when it does arrive it is out-of-date, ill-fitting or not up to standard.

    “We have feedback from our members that they are being leaned on by NHS bosses not to raise the PPE shortages – but Unite urges them to #staysafenot silent and to #telluswhatPPEyouneed.

    “And we will back you to the hilt in raising these legitimate concerns that are of the highest public interest.

    “The testing regime totters between the shambolic and the messy. There is little openness and transparency about how the government will hit its increased 200,000 daily test target.

    “We have thousands of healthcare science members who could be used to better effect and engaged more substantively, so we can avoid the situation where samples are sent to America for analysis.

    “It appears that the right hand does not know what the left hand is doing as the ‘test, track and trace’ initiative struggles to get off the ground in a meaningful way.

    “Finally, our members are furious at the leaked Treasury assessment that a public sector pay freeze could be on the cards to pay for the cost of the pandemic. If the Thursday ‘clap for carers’ means anything, it should be that there can be no return to the age of austerity.

    “More than 270 NHS and social care workers have died due to Covid-19 and hundreds of thousands more are risking their lives on a daily basis to care for others – yet this does not seem to stop Treasury mandarins drawing up heartless proposals to freeze public sector pay, which a recent Unite survey has shown the public does not want.”

    The unions’ blueprint includes fast, comprehensive and accessible testing, and the ongoing, ample supply of protective kit, as well as calls for staff to be paid properly for every hour worked.

    Notes

    The NHS unions are: British Association of Occupational Therapists, British Dental Association, British Dietetic Association, British Orthoptists Society, Chartered Society of Physiotherapists, College of Podiatry, Federation of Clinical Scientists, GMB, Healthcare Consultants and Specialists Association, Managers in Partnership, Prison Officers Association, Royal College of Midwives, Royal College of Nursing, Society of Radiographers, UNISON and Unite.

    The final text of the blueprint is here

    Unions have been asking the government to fund a consistent approach to overtime across the whole NHS. They are currently awaiting government sign off on a joint proposal from employers and unions.

    The 16 unions represent health workers covering the whole of the UK. There may be issues specific to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland that can be taken up with the employer/union structures of those administrations.

    Twitter: @unitetheunion Facebook: unitetheunion1 Web: unitetheunion.org

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    A confidential Treasury document leaked to The Telegraph revealed the government is considering a two-year public sector freeze to pay for the coronavirus response.

    The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) has hit back at any attempt to make key workers pay for yet another crisis they did not cause and has vowed to fight any real-terms pay cut.

    Matt Wrack, FBU general secretary, said:

    “Public sector workers were forced to pay for a financial crisis caused by the banks’ drive for endless profits and by a negligent government deregulation agenda. Now, once again, the Tories are preparing to make the same workers pay for another crisis they did not cause.

    “Firefighters have had a real-terms pay cut of around £4,000 over the last decade, much like workers across the public sector. Key workers and the public they serve will not accept another attempt to pass the buck from the rich to working people.  Far from discussing pay cuts, the government should instead be considering how best it can reward those who have got us through this pandemic.

    “The government is talking about dishing out medals to key workers in one breath, whilst planning pay cuts for them in another. We will fight any attempt to make those who see us through the coronavirus crisis pay for it with another real-terms pay cut.”

    Media contacts

    Joe Karp-Sawey, FBU communications officer
    FBU press office
    press@fbu.org,uk

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    THE GOVERNMENT’S DUTY TO KEEP THE PUBLIC SAFE OUTSOURCED TO THE PRIVATE SECTOR

    HANCOCK INCREASES PRIVATISATION BY STEALTH

    On Monday, the news broke that contact tracking and tracing (the next stage in managing the pandemic) will be outsourced to the private sector in the form of at least two private call-centre operators, one of which is Serco. They are providing 15,000 or more staff who, after one day of training, will be given a script to follow in conversations with people who have been in contact with confirmed cases of Covid-19.

    Ministers have been using the pandemic as an excuse to by-pass “normal” procedures for awarding Government contracts which involve invitations to tender and have been awarding contracts to a string of private companies and management consultants with no open competition.

    Even these “normal procedures” are a way the Tories privatise the NHS – the way they first began to do it – by insisting services which had previously been provided in-house by NHS employees, be “put out to tender”. Which is how firms like Carillion which went bust in Jan 2018 leaving debts of £7 billion, G4S, ISS, Sodexo, Bouygues and others came to be the employers of hospital porters, cleaners and catering services. A privatisation process dating back to 1979 and the Thatcher government and including more recently the Private Finance Initiative supported by the Labour Government of Tony Blair, but accepted as a disastrous debt-generator by subsequent Labour leaders.

    The Government has proved itself totally inept at managing the health crisis caused by the Coronavirus. It ignored the findings of Exercise Cygnus in 2016 which forecast the need – in the event of a pandemic – for ventilators, PPE and all the equipment which the NHS now faces a dangerous shortage of. The Government did not want to spend the money. In fact it has been cutting the NHS to the bone instead.

    Worse than cutting the funding, it has also been cherry-picking lucrative bits of the NHS and offering them to private investors for private gain at the expense of service to patients.

    When Johnson said “The NHS saved my life”, voters may have concluded “the NHS is safe in his hands. The Government understands how important it is now.” They do, but ten years of deconstructing the national service, outsourcing and privatising have gathered momentum and still retain their ideological grip on this government with its zero experience of worry about where the rent is coming from, or the next meal. The NHS has been viewed by the Tories as a potential cash cow for private investors and their already-rich Tory-supporting friends and it still is as these contracts for testing and tracing illustrate.

    At the beginning of the Covid Crisis, the SHA said, as did most of the medical profession and its journals, a range of statisticians, forecasters, epidemiologists and other scientists, that the dismissive and over-confident decisions of Johnson and Trump were seriously ill-founded; that pursuing the idea of “Herd Immunity” would mean that the NHS would be overwhelmed, and that the Government should accept the hand of friendship from the EU and other countries which offered to share sourcing of needed equipment (despite the “we can do better on our own” series of snubs to the rest of Europe, emanating from the UK Tory Government since 2016).

    These commentators urged the adoption of effective measures.

    1. To slow down the spread so the emergency services could cope, hence the lockdown, though the UK Government was slow to introduce it compared to other countries.

     

    1. To test for the virus and trace the contacts of those infected, so the lockdown could be relaxed without a second wave of the epidemic. Again the UK Government was slow to implement this. SHA President and Prof. of Public Health, Allyson Pollock said that tasks including testing, contact tracing and purchasing should be handled through regional authorities rather than central government.

    This was delayed while a private sector plan was cobbled together presumably to pre-empt the NHS, local authorities and other public sector bodies being asked to do the same, though they have a greater range of contacts, experience and expertise in spite of the relentless down-grading of the public health infrastructure and the budgetary strangulation of local councils.

    1. This would give time for a longer-term solution, and the development of a vaccine to reduce the numbers likely to get Covid-19 again, or reduce its severity.

    Firms such as Serco, Mitie, Boots, Deloitte, KPMG, and a US “data-mining” group called Palantir, have already acquired the rights to manage Covid-19 drive-in test centres, the building of the Nightingale Hospitals, and the purchasing of PPE. Deloitte, for example, is a multinational “professional services network” and one of the largest accounting organisations in the world, managed to acquire a contract to advise the Government on PPE purchases a few weeks ago. It thus took more decision-making authority from the NHS and local authorities, and shifted more power from the frontline. “It’s a power grab”, said Rosie Cooper MP, and we must protest in the strongest possible terms.

    Deloitte has had a poor track record in delivering PPE to the front line since the pandemic began, and taking more decision-making from NHS managers and local authorities shifts power further from the frontline and money for services into private pockets  The tax-payer pays for declining service.

    The Guardian said that NHS Trusts have now been instructed by the DHSC to stop buying their own PPE and ventilators or high value equipment for more general use in hospitals such as mobile X-ray machines, CT scanners and ultrasound machines.

    The system of tracking and tracing will be enabled by an NHS app on smart phones that alerts people that they have been near someone known to have the virus, or if they come into contact with an infected person in the future. Calling it an “NHS app” is no doubt intended to reassure people who might not want to use a Serco or Deloitte app for fear of what might happen to data on where they have been and to whom they might have been close. However, most of the contact tracing work will be contracted out to Serco and at least one other private-sector firm.

    The app goes on trial on the Isle of Wight this week. Supporters of the SHA on the Island (currently busy in a cooperative project of people with sewing machines, recycling donated duvet covers and sheets into scrubs for the frontline) tell us that it went live yesterday with NHS and Council staff, and will reach the rest of the Island by Thursday.

    The Isle of Wight was chosen as an area relatively cut off from the rest of the country during the lockdown, so a good place to study the spread of a virus. Currently there are limited ferry services for lorries transporting food and medicine and for ambulances to transfer serious medical cases to Southampton or Portsmouth. In addition the population is older than the UK average and fewer people have smart phones, so if it works reasonably well in those circumstances it should work even better nationally, says Hancock.

    South Korea did not go into lockdown. It adopted a strategy of widespread tracing and mass testing. Take-up would have to be very extensive for this to work here. There will be resistance to detailed personal data being collected by a multinational company. David Blunkett tried to get us to all have ID cards after 9/11 and met strong opposition from civil rights lawyers, trade unions and, indeed, Tories.

    The government is using the pandemic to transfer key public health activities from the NHS and other state bodies to the private sector. In 1977, Nicholas Ridley wrote a pre-Thatcher plan for the Tory Research Department in which he outlined a strategy of “privatisation of the NHS by stealth”.  “Managing” Covid 19 presents a good opportunity for taking this  further, building on the destructive intent of the 2012 Health & Social Care Act enabling a Tory government to give even more taxpayers money to the private sector.

    Testing and tracing is to be given to the public limited company Serco and others as yet undisclosed, but likely to include the security services firm G4S. Serco became infamous   for having tagged thousands of criminals who either did not exist or were dead and “other botched government contracts”, reported The Financial Times in 2015. The chief executive is Rupert Soames, appointed to turn around the business (whose shares had dropped 50%) who in turn recruited Sir Roy Gardner as Chair and replaced almost the entire board.

    Now, Serco has been appointed by the Johnson Administration to perform public health tasks in England for which it has little experience and little credibility with the general public. This tells you all you need to know about the current Government. Forget all the PR post Covid survival thanks to the NHS and the protestations of undying love for it.

    The real values of the Government are revealed in this move to spread public largesse to its own, although it will rely on public support for the NHS to get people to allow data on their every movement to be collected by a spy on their phone

    The reason why the NHS gets such massive support is because the general public use it, see it first-hand, recognise its skill and, crucially, know – in some imprecise way – that it is “theirs”.  It exists to look after all who come to it for its skills, whether Prime Ministers,  homeless veterans, newly born babies, or those beyond cure but never beyond care. And free at the point of use.

    In contrast, however well run Serco might be, and however well it learns in three weeks what it has taken local government and the NHS decades to absorb, its first duty is to its share holders and the need to pay a dividend.   In this century it will never get the trust that the NHS acquired in the last. Trust and values matter, especially where using personal information and getting the co-operation of millions of the public is concerned. The Times  reported Grant Shapps, the Transport Secretary, as saying the Government would have to make downloading the app “a duty to the NHS”.

    Further, at a time when it is abundantly clear that the NHS, local government, and bits of the already part privatised social care system cannot continue with the pre-Covid-19 settlement, the Serco option is as old fashioned as it is unwise.

    This is one part of the Government’s plan that Labour has to expose and oppose. Now!

    Vivien Walsh & Tony Beddow

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    From Ekua Bayunu, Member of Greater Manchester Socialist Health Association, and selected candidate for Hulme in the next Manchester City Council elections.

    When I joined SHA a couple of years ago I wanted to focus my energies on action against inequalities in the health systems around race, particularly in mental health. We now have evidence of the toxins that were seeping into us from the right, distracting us from actually building effective socialist action on health issues here in Greater Manchester.

    Skip forward and we are slap bang in the eye of the storm of the Covid 19 pandemic and still searching for some strength in our unity to make a difference to our communities. Many of our members are fully immersed in either working on the frontline, in providing care in our institutions, or in volunteering in mutual aid groups, many doing both and I send love and admiration out to us all.

    We lost my neighbour, an elderly Somalian man, to the virus on the last weekend in March. It felt like the storm that was brewing had just swept in and taken one of ours before we barely knew it was coming. Then the statistics started coming in. We are dying in inexplicably large numbers. We? I’m a woman of African heritage, my community is African, South Asian, Working class.

    My close friend, a street away, is a nurse working at MRI, already stressed by the lack of PPE, worrying about her family, the risk she posed to her 3 daughters and husband at home, when she got ill two weeks ago, together with two colleagues from her ward. They got tested. She doesn’t have access to a car, and the only testing is drive-through. No you can’t walk in. No you can’t get in a taxi! She started talking to us about wills and supporting her daughters and all the worries she has for them. Her eldest also works as a nurse, the youngest is only 10. Her cultural background is Turkish, and she knew she might die.

    She is in recovery, but the statistics get worse and worse. The demand for action grows as do the questions and desire for investigation. I read articles in the silo of my social media accounts and watched as it began to break slowly into mainstream media. At first I thought: they are holding back on the narrative, because it doesn’t suit their agenda to highlight how many were dying in service to us all who were from Diasporan African, Asian and other minority communities. We entered this year with forced deportations built on a narrative that these were the communities of criminals and spongers on the state. Suddenly the NHS workforce were our heroes, they put out ads supporting these workers and most of the workers were white. Did you all notice?

    Then as the statistics leaked into a wider societal consciousness, I became openly worried. Information being fed via the television is so absent of any real analysis that it actually begins to shape a eugenicist narrative, which the Prime Minister does little to distance himself from. Our deaths are not real sacrifices based on years of inequalities in education, health care, housing and employment, but gives out a message of our inherent weakness and inferiority! And whilst we all are shut in, angry, confused, needing to have something or someone to blame, in the place of blaming this government for its lack of care in putting profit over people, it is easy to discern they are creating a diversionary agenda.

    It is becoming increasingly clear BAME people are dying disproportionally, on the wards, driving our buses, cleaning our streets, in our care homes. They are presented as the problem, when they are the heroes and victims of the pandemic. Last week the government finally pulled together a commission with PHE to investigate the causes of BAME people dying disproportionally. Do we all assume that the why will lead to how to stop this? To a solution to help us? I can’t.

    Posted by Jean Hardiman Smith on behalf of Ekua Bayunu, Member of Greater Manchester Socialist Health Association

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    From Mark Ladbrooke, of Oxford SHA branch, and formerly chair of Oxford University Hospitals Foundation Trust (OUHT) Joint Union Committee

    Oscar King, Jr. and Elbert Rico, porters at John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, and union activists, died two weeks ago of suspected Covid-19.

    Both of them are married to members of the nursing team at the hospital and Twilight, Oscar’s wife, was admitted to hospital, while their 10-year old daughter is being cared for. Oscar and Rico came from the Philippines and had worked at the hospital since they arrived.
    The Filipino community is extremely important to the NHS – after workers from the UK itself and India they make up the largest proportion of the workforce.

    Patients may not notice the porters as much as they notice doctors and nurses, but their role is just as vital, since they take everyone where they need to go, and move equipment and machinery to where it is required. The Labour Movement has supported junior doctors and nurses in dispute with management (backed by government) at various times – but porters, domestics and catering staff are frequently outsourced and are at the end of the queue.

    As long ago as 1982 the Thatcher government brought in competitive tendering for NHS services such as catering, cleaning, portering and estates maintenance. Oxford University Hospitals Foundation NHS Trust (OUHT), of which the Radcliffe is part, signed up to a Private Finance Initiative (PFI) deal, under which management of the porters, domestics and catering staff was transferred to a private company as the hospital was expanded. PFI was dreamed up when Norman Lamont was Tory Chancellor, but took off under the New Labour Government of Tony Blair after 1997.

    A Unison strike in Dudley in 2000 was the seventh against transfer to the private sector, as part of increasing resistance to PFI. The striking workers won important concessions around secondment, nevertheless management was still transferred to Carillion (which went bust in Jan 2018). The John Radcliffe workers threatened strike action in 2015 around pay cuts.
    Industrial action continues to be taken against PFI and its impact on working conditions, most recently this year in Lewisham (because the outsourcing firm failed to pay cleaners, porters and catering staff the wages that had been agreed) and Paddington. In the latter case, porters, caterers and cleaning staff at St Mary’s, with the support of some of the other staff, including doctors, became employees once again of the NHS.

    We, in the Joint Union Committee and local SHA branch knew Oscar, in particular, as a “brilliant rank and file union leader”. The SHA branch is well connected to the workplace and local unions. They help provide the leadership of the branch. The Chair of the SHA branch, Cllr Nadine Bely-Summers, a nurse, who also represents Oxford City Council on the local Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee (HOSC), demanded answers from Bruno Holtof, chief executive of the OUHT, about the deaths of the two porters:


    – How many staff on site are managed by outsourcing companies or agencies?
    – What personal protective equipment (PPE) was provided by the trust to staff managed by outsourcing companies or agencies?
    – What personal Protective Equipment (PPE) was provided by the trust to staff managed by Bouygues and other outsourcers eg G4S? When was this provided?
    – Are staff being put under pressure to return to work while reporting sick?
    – How are the frontline outsourced staff who are vulnerable being treated?
    – Is the Trust legally liable for Health and Safety breaches on its premises including those by outsourcing companies and agencies?

    In response to her demands the Director of Public Health has promised to investigate further.
    BAME Labour activists working with Oxford City’s Labour Council have raised concerns that this may be part of a worrying national picture of an especially high death toll among black and Asian workers, as reported on various TV channels and in several daily newspapers in the last week.

    The local city council has written to the Chief Executive of the NHS Trust asking for an explanation.
    Nadine said “We must seek assurances from all NHS Trusts that there is day-to-day monitoring carried out to make sure there is not a disproportionate impact of the rates of infection and death on ethnic minority workers, and that adequate PPE are being provided at all times to all staff groups”.

    Stop Press!

    The Chief Executive of the Trust has written back to the council saying, among other things:
    We note, however in the case of reporting incidents in relation to Covid-19, that the HSE have indicated that “[in] a work situation, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, for employers to establish whether or not any infection in an individual was contracted as a result of their work. Therefore, diagnosed cases of Covid 19 are not reportable under RIDDOR ( Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations )  unless a very clear work related link is established.”

    We are unable to comment in detail on specific individual cases but are able to note that there is not currently evidence to support such a link in relation to these two staff members. However we can confirm that reporting and investigation will take place in line with HSE guidance where a diagnosis of Covid-19 is directly attributed to an occupational exposure.

    Oxford and District Labour Party Executive has asked Anneliese Dodds (Labour Oxford East) to raise this issue in parliament. She reports that Labour is planning to raise such issues on workers’ memorial day.

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    • Plans include major cuts to fire engines and staffing levels
    • FBU says it amounts to a ‘betrayal’ of firefighters and the public

    Firefighters have warned of a major threat to public safety as politicians and fire chiefs try to sneak through cuts to the fire and rescue services while firefighters respond to the coronavirus crisis.

    The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) made the comments after a consultation on sweeping fire and rescue cuts was launched mid-pandemic.

    The union has called out the Prime Minister and other government ministers for clapping key workers on a Thursday while turning a blind eye to brutal cuts to a frontline emergency service.

    Firefighters have agreed to take on sweeping new duties to respond to the coronavirus pandemic, including moving dead bodies, driving ambulances, and producing PPE, at the request of the government and the National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC).

    But East Sussex’s Conservative-controlled fire authority has decided to consult the public on sweeping cuts to the county’s fire service, detailed in an Integrated Risk Management Plan (IRMP) drawn up by Chief Fire Officer Dawn Whittaker and senior managers before the coronavirus outbreak.

    The proposals include major cuts to the number of fire engines, staffing levels, and nighttime fire cover.

    The proposals include

    • Cutting 10 fire engines across the county from Battle, Bexhill, Crowborough, Lewes, Newhaven, Rye, Uckfield, Seaford, Heathfield and Wadhurst stations;
    • Cutting dedicated crews for high-reaching aerial fire appliance
    • Cutting wholetime staffing  levels across the county, particularly at stations in Lewes, Newhaven, Uckfield, Crowborough, Battle and Bexhill stations
    • Reducing night time fire cover at The Ridge fire station

    The FBU has accused fire chiefs and politicians of using the cover of the pandemic to sneak through the plans and has warned the public that this could be the first of many attempts to rush through decisions on cuts to services whilst attention is elsewhere.

    Since 2011, fire and rescue services in the UK have had 11,500 firefighters cut from their staff, and since 2013 have seen real-terms spending on their service slashed by 38%.

    In neighbouring Surrey, the FBU agreed to suspend planned industrial action so that firefighters could help communities through the crisis.

    Matt Wrack, FBU general secretary, said:

    “The Prime Minister and other government ministers are asking people to clap for frontline workers on a Thursday, while their policies continue gutting frontline services. It’s shameless hypocrisy.

    “While firefighters are taking on sweeping new areas of work to keep their communities safe, they have been completely betrayed by fire chiefs and politicians.

    “Frankly, we don’t know what the world will look like on the other side of this pandemic. Across the political spectrum, people are crying out that we cannot go back to normal – and that has to mean an end to brutal cuts to frontline services.

    “We have entered national negotiations in good faith to help communities through this crisis. If politicians and the NFCC want that to continue, they need to step in and stop these cuts.

    “This could be the first of many attempts to sneak through cuts to services while the public focuses on the pandemic. If politicians think they are going to make public services pay for this crisis, then they are sadly mistaken.”

    Simon Herbert, East Sussex firefighter and FBU brigade chair, said:

    “Firefighters are out on the frontline helping our communities through this crisis whilst still responding to fires and other emergencies.

    “Meanwhile, our fire authority has thanked us by beginning the process of decimating our emergency response capabilities and ability to save lives, all from the safety of their living rooms.

    “These proposals are dangerous and will seriously damage the availability of fire crews throughout East Sussex. These proposals deserve proper public scrutiny – not an ill-thought-out consultation process snuck out in the middle of the pandemic.”

    National media contacts

    Joe Karp-Sawey, FBU communications officer

    FBU press office
    press@fbu.org.uk

     

    • On Saturday, Matt Wrack, FBU general secretary, said in an interview with BBC News: “”It’s great that people are going out and clapping on a Thursday night, but the question will be – because clapping is not enough – what are we going to do as a society to redress the balance a bit and give recognition?”: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-52403609
    • The draft IRMP for East Sussex fire and rescue service 2020-2025, detailing cuts to the service, is available here: https://esfrs.moderngov.co.uk/documents/s1027/200423%20CFA%20IRMP%202020-25%20REPORT.pdf
    • The agenda from the East Sussex fire authority meeting is available here: https://esfrs.moderngov.co.uk/ieListDocuments.aspx?CId=136&MId=333&Ver=4
    • Firefighters can now construct vital protective face shields for NHS and care staff, drive ambulances in parts of the country, will also now begin transferring both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients from Nightingale hospitals, after the latest agreement between the FBU, the NFCC, and National Employers: https://www.fbu.org.uk/news/2020/04/24/firefighters-make-face-shields-health-and-care-staff-and-transfer-patients-and
    • Under previous agreements, firefighters are now permitted to assist ambulance services in some specified activities and drive ambulances; deliver food and medicines to vulnerable people; and, in the case of mass casualties due to COVID-19, move dead bodies. In the West Midlands and parts of the East Midlands, body movement work has now begun.
    • Firefighters can also fit face masks and deliver vital PPE and medical supplies to NHS and care staff; take samples for COVID-19 antigen tests; drive ambulances to non-emergency outpatient appointments and to transport those in need of urgent care; and to train non-emergency service personnel to drive ambulances: https://www.fbu.org.uk/news/2020/04/16/coronavirus-firefighters-now-allowed-carry-out-antigen-tests
    • The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) is the professional and democratic voice of firefighters and other workers within fire and rescue services across the UK. The general secretary is Matt Wrack
    • The FBU is on Twitter: @fbunational and Facebook: facebook.com/FireBrigadesUnion1918
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