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    From Vivien Walsh in Manchester

    Right at the beginning of the lockdown, several of my friends said how concerned they were about the likely impact of enforced social isolation on those who are suffering from domestic abuse. On Monday, the (cross party) Home Affairs Committee of MPs, chaired by Yvette Cooper, reported on this, demanding “that the Government makes domestic violence and abuse a central pillar of the broader strategy to combat the Covid-19 epidemic.”

    Calls to domestic violence helplines, such as Refuge and Women’s Aid, were nearly 50% higher in the week 6-12 April than the average before the pandemic began. Visits to the website of Refuge were three times as high in March 2020 as they were in March 2019. The Home Affairs Committee called for this domestic violence strategy to combine “awareness, prevention, victim support, housing and a criminal justice response, backed by dedicated funding and ministerial leadership”.

    It also made a point of the need for specialist services for different ethnic communities, and for legal aid as an automatic right for women applying for Domestic Violence Protection Orders (DVPOs). An extension of the current time limit for reporting offences is also necessary, since many abused women will be unable to report the abuse they have suffered until after lockdown ends.

    Between March 23 and April 12 there were at least 16 killings of women and children in domestic situations, said the report on Monday. The average number of deaths from domestic violence during lockdown has gone up from 5 per week from a figure of two before. In a year that would be over 250 women killed by the person who is supposed to love them. The Parliamentary Committee had also received evidence that incidents reported were not only more frequent but involved higher levels of violence and coercive control.

    Unless the government takes action to deal effectively with domestic abuse and to properly support the victims of it, we will be facing “devastating consequences for a generation.” Funding is urgently needed to enable a growth in provision of housing for women and children escaping from violence, and to support refuges as temporary accommodation and support. Even before current emergency, England had 30% fewer than the recommended number of beds, and 64% of referrals were turned down in 2018-19.

    There is a National Domestic Violence Helpline (0808 200 247). This is the number to call for  emergency referrals as they are open 24/7. In addition there a variety of services based locally. For example Manchester Women’s Aid (call 0161 660 7999  9:30am-4:30pm Mon-Fri) provides confidential advice and information, safe temporary housing, one to one support for those living in their own homes, access to legal advice and civil orders, specialist workshops for young women 15-25, language workers and access to interpreters, specialist support for women with poor mental health and drug and alcohol misuse. The full list of services in England and Wales is at the end of the article.

    The lockdown is in place to keep people safe from the virus: but it is also providing cover for abusers. Escape from being locked in with an abuser is a matter of life and death. A decade of austerity has not only undermined our NHS, on which we are now so dependent, but has also decimated support for survivors of domestic violence. The Government must increase funding as a matter of urgency – and there will be just as much need for services as abused women and children try to return to “normal” life when the lockdown is over. And Children’s services also need a big increase in funding to make sure children as risk, not only from the mental and physical impact of domestic violence, have access to help and support.

    Amna Abdullatif (whose day job is Women’s Aid lead for Children and Young People, and who is also a Manchester City Councillor) added the following information for the SHA in this blog: “78% of survivors experiencing domestic abuse told us that Covid-19 has made it harder for them to leave their abuser. If you’re feeling trapped, we’re here for you.”

    “Our Live Chat is now open from 10am – 2pm with expert support workers just one click away. You can be reassured that our Live Chat is completely confidential. To access support and advice go to: https://bit.ly/2y7ab0Q

    “If you, or someone you know, is experiencing abuse please read our Covid-19 safety advice for survivors, family, friends and community members https://bit.ly/2yNzqoW

    There are also local services for ethnic groups, such as Saheli Asian Women’s Project in Manchester, which provides advice, information and support services to Asian women and their children fleeing domestic abuse and/or forced marriages.

    The full list of services from the Womens Aid web site is below:

    National Domestic Abuse Helpline

    The National Domestic Abuse Helpline is run by Refuge and offers free, confidential support 24 hours a day to victims and those who are worried about friends and loved ones.

    Telephone and TypeTalk: 0808 2000 247

    Wales Live Fear Free Helpline

    The Wales Live Fear Free Helpline offers help and advice about violence against women, domestic abuse and sexual violence.

    Telephone: 0808 8010 800

    TypeTalk: 18001 080 8801

    Text: 078600 77 333

    The Men’s Advice Line

    The Men’s Advice Line is a confidential helpline for male victims of domestic abuse and those supporting them.

    Telephone: 0808 801 0327

    Email: info@mensadviceline.org.uk

    Galop – for members of the LGBT+ community

    Galop runs the National LGBT+ domestic abuse helpline.

    Telephone: 0800 999 5428

    TypeTalk: 18001 020 7704 2040

    Email: help@galop.org.uk

    Women’s Aid

    Women’s Aid has a live chat service available Mondays to Fridays between 10am and 12pm as well as an online survivor’s forum. You can also find your local domestic abuse service on their website.

    The Survivor’s Handbook, created by Women’s Aid, provides information on housing, money, helping your children and your legal rights.

    Karma Nirvana

    Karma Nirvana runs a national honour-based abuse and forced marriage helpline. If you are unable to call or email, you can send a message securely on the website.

    Telephone: 0800 5999 247

    Email: support@karmanirvana.org.uk

    Hestia

    Hestia provides a free mobile app, Bright Sky, which provides support and information to anyone who may be in an abusive relationship or those concerned about someone they know.

    Chayn

    Chayn provides online help and resources in a number of languages about identifying manipulative situations and how friends can support those being abused.

    Imkaan

    Imkaan are a women’s organisation addressing violence against black and minority women and girls.

    Southall Black Sisters

    Southall Black Sisters offer advocacy and information to Asian and Afro-Caribbean women suffering abuse.

    Stay Safe East

    Stay Safe East provides advocacy and support services to disabled victims and survivors of abuse.

    Telephone: 020 8519 7241

    Text: 07587 134 122

    Email: enquiries@staysafe-east.org.uk

    SignHealth

    SignHealth provides domestic abuse service support for deaf people in British Sign Language (BSL).

    Telephone: 020 3947 2601

    Text/WhatsApp/Facetime: 07970 350366

    Email: da@signhealth.org.uk

    Shelter

    Shelter provide free confidential information, support and legal advice on all housing and homelessness issues including a webchat service.

    Sexual Assault Referral Centres

    Sexual Assault Referral Centres provide advice and support services to victims and survivors of sexual assault or abuse.

    Get help if you think you may be an abuser

    If you are concerned that you or someone you know may be an abuser, there is support available.

    Respect is an anonymous and confidential helpline for men and women who are harming their partners and families. The helpline also takes calls from partners or ex-partners, friends and relatives who are concerned about perpetrators. A webchat service is available Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 10am to 11am and from 3pm to 4pm.

    Telephone: 0808 802 4040

    Get help for children and young people

    NSPCC

    The NSPCC helpline is available for advice and support for anyone with concerns about a child.

    The NSPCC has issued guidance for spotting and reporting the signs of abuse.

    Telephone: 0808 800 5000

    Email: help@nspcc.org.uk

    If you are deaf or hard of hearing, you can contact the NSPCC via SignVideo using your webcam. SignVideo, using British Sign Language, is available on PC, Mac, iOS (iPhone/iPad) and Android smartphones (4.2 or above). This service is available Monday to Friday from 8am to 8pm and Saturdays from 8am to 1pm.

    Childline

    Childline provides help and support to children and young people.

    Telephone: 0800 1111

    Barnardo’s

    Barnardo’s provide support to families affected by domestic abuse.

    Family Lives

    Family Lives provide support through online forums.

    Support for employers

    Employers’ Initiative on Domestic Abuse

    The Employers’ Initiative on Domestic Abuse website provides resources to support employers including an employers’ toolkit.

    Support for professionals

    SafeLives provides guidance and support to professionals and those working in the domestic abuse sector, as well as additional advice for those at risk.

    Support a friend if they’re being abused

    If you’re worried a friend is being abused, let them know you’ve noticed something is wrong. Neighbours and community members can be a life-line for those living with domestic abuse. Look out for your neighbours, if someone reaches out to you there is advice on this page about how to respond. They might not be ready to talk, but try to find quiet times when they can talk if they choose to. If someone confides in you that they’re suffering domestic abuse:

    • listen, and take care not to blame them
    • acknowledge it takes strength to talk to someone about experiencing abuse
    • give them time to talk, but don’t push them to talk if they don’t want to
    • acknowledge they’re in a frightening and difficult situation
    • tell them nobody deserves to be threatened or beaten, despite what the abuser has said
    • support them as a friend – encourage them to express their feelings, and allow them to make their own decisions
    • don’t tell them to leave the relationship if they’re not ready – that’s their decision
    • ask if they have suffered physical harm – if so, offer to go with them to a hospital or GP
    • help them report the assault to the police if they choose to
    • be ready to provide information on organisations that offer help for people experiencing domestic abuse

    If you are worried that a friend, neighbour or loved one is a victim of domestic abuse then you can call the National Domestic Abuse Helpline for free and confidential advice, 24 hours a day on 0808 2000 247.

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