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    This week the Government is expected to announce that it will scrap the pandemic response function of Public Health England, and merge this with NHS Test and Trace to form an agency “similar to the German Robert Koch Institute”. It is also particularly distressing that the news was leaked to the press before PHE staff could be told.

    The SHA warns the reckless decision to restructure and defund public health services in the midst of a pandemic will result in further avoidable deaths. The public health service, nationally and locally has already been severely starved of funds as a result of austerity.

    The NHS Test and Trace Service (led by Baroness Dido Harding, and run by Deloitte, Serco, Sitel and other private sector outsourcing companies) has received strong criticism for its poor response to the COVID 19 pandemic.

    Dr Brian Fisher, SHA Chair, says “This is yet another example of the Government putting lives at risk by pursuing ideologically driven privatisation in a time of crisis.”

    Socialist Health Association members have told us that “this is another example of this government’s scapegoating, most especially since the man telling us the PHE response has been unacceptable was the man in charge, deliberately ignoring their expert recommendations and favouring sweet manufacturers and other non-expert businesses to deliver a service to the public. Public health has been underfunded, to the point it has required almost superhuman efforts from its staff to maintain a quality of service from the time of the so called Lansley Reforms. For that, our public health experts, like our nurses, are rewarded with a kick in the teeth.”

    SHA calls on the Government to reinvest funds from failing NHS Test and Trace private providers into the public sector pandemic response across the NHS, Public Health England and Local Authorities.

    1 Comment
    Public Health England (PHE) and its dedicated staff are being lined up as ‘the fall guy’ for ministers’ bungling over the handling of the coronavirus pandemic, Unite, Britain and Ireland’s largest union, said today (Monday 17 August).
    Unite, which is the lead union for employees at PHE, said that instead of merging PHE into a new body charged with preventing future pandemics, the PHE should continue in its present role – and the money cut from its budget by the government should be restored.
    Unite also said that there should be proper consultations with the unions about the future of PHE, an executive agency of the Department of Health and Social Care. Unite strongly disputes media reports that the unions were consulted.
    Unite national officer for health Jackie Williams said: “It is clear that Public Health England and its dedicated staff are being lined up to be the fall guy for continual bungling by Boris Johnson and his ministers since coronavirus emerged at the beginning of the year.
    “The catalogue of errors ranges from the lateness to lockdown in March to the failure to have a so-called ‘world beating’ test-and-trace system in place by June.
    “In their desperation to find anyone or any organisation to blame for their own failings, Boris Johnson and health and social care secretary Matt Hancock are lining up the PHE and its staff to be the fall guy.
    “We think that the underlying agenda here is the future privatisation of PHE’s national infection service – the Tory government is obsessed with NHS privatisation which has been shown to be highly flawed and not a good use of taxpayers’ money.
    “We are calling for PHE to continue in its present role and allowed to do its vital work, rather than spend huge amounts of time, effort and money reorganising England’s public health structures in the middle of a global pandemic.
    “We are also calling for the swingeing cuts to its budget over recent years restored. The lack of consultation is both appalling and insulting.
    “PHE needs to have the resources to do the job it is designed to do, which is protecting the public health of the people in England, without inappropriate buck-passing political interference.”
    Shaun Noble
    Unite senior communications officer
    2 Comments

    The Camden New Journal (CNJ) have published the sixth article about the NHS written by Susanna Mitchell and Roy Trevelion. You can see it on the CNJ website under ‘Forum’ published on 16 July 2020 here. Or you can read it below:

    Neglect and inadequate excuses lie at the heart of the government’s failures, argue Susanna Mitchell & Roy Trevelion

    It is understood that there will be a public inquiry into the UK’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

    This should begin now, and not when the current crisis is over. Criticisms will be focused on the government’s disastrous response:

    Its initial adoption of a “herd immunity” strategy.

    Its failure to provide health care workers and others in front-line positions with adequate personal protective equipment (PPE).

    The shambolic state of its belated testing and tracking operations, including the collapse of its much-heralded app.

    Its reliance on private contractors with no relevant experience to supply services and equipment that they were subsequently unable to deliver.

    Critically, it will be claimed that all the measures taken were put in place far too late. With the result that the UK now has the highest death toll in Europe. The proportion of care-home deaths is 13 times greater than that of Germany.

    All these accusations are currently being met with the excuse that the Covid-19 pandemic was unprecedented. The government claims it has worked to its utmost capacity to control and manage the outbreak.

    But this narrow focus on what was done once the virus had established itself in the country is completely inadequate.

    Rather, any inquiry must examine the long-standing reasons why the country was unable to deal with the situation in a more efficient way. Unless this is done, the necessary steps to improve our handling of future pandemics cannot begin.

    For a start, the argument that government was taken by surprise by a global viral attack is false.

    To the contrary, a research project called Exercise Cygnus was set up in 2016 to examine the question of preparedness for exactly this eventuality.

    Its report was delivered in July 2017 to all major government departments, NHS England, and the devolved administrations of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    The report concluded that “…the UK’s preparedness and response, in terms of its plans, policies and capability” were insufficient to cope with such a situation.

    It recommended NHS England should conduct further work to prepare “surge capacity” in the health service and that money should be ring-fenced to provide extra capacity and support in the NHS.

    It also stated that the social care system needed to be able to expand if it were to cope with a “worst-case scenario pandemic”.

    These warnings, however, were effectively ignored.

    One government source is reported as saying that the results of the research were “too terrifying” to be revealed.

    And a senior academic directly involved in Cygnus and the current pandemic remarked: “These exercises are supposed to prepare government for something like this – but it appears they were aware of the problem but didn’t do much about it… basically [there is] a lack of attention to what would be needed to prevent a disease like this from overwhelming the system.

    “All the flexibility has been pared away so it’s difficult to react quickly. Nothing is ready to go.”

    But the reason that the system was too inflexible and unprepared lies squarely with the government’s actions during the last decade.

    The Health and Social Care Act of 2012 ruinously fragmented the system.

    The austerity and privatisation of these polices have lethally weakened both the NHS and the social care services.

    As a result, the NHS is under-staffed, under-equipped and critically short of beds, while the social care service is crippled by underfunding almost to the point of collapse. It is therefore vital that we do not allow any inquiry to be limited to an examination of recent mistakes.

    The government’s bungled handling of the present crisis was virtually inevitable within a public health system depleted and rendered inadequate by their long-term policies.

    No post mortem can achieve a productive conclusion unless it is understood that these policies were the root cause of the shambles.

    If we are to avoid another catastrophe, these policies must be radically changed with the minimum of delay, and public health put back into public hands.

    • Susanna Mitchell and Roy Trevelion are members of the Socialist Health Association.

    Other articles written by Susanna Mitchell and Roy Trevelion are:

    Don’t allow the price of drugs to soar: Drug pricing is still a critical issue for the NHS http://camdennewjournal.com/article/dont-allow-the-price-of-drugs-to-soar?sp=1&sq=Susanna%2520Mitchell

    Beware false prophets: Don’t be fooled by the Johnson government’s promise of new money. It masks a move to further privatise the NHS
    http://camdennewjournal.com/article/nhs-beware-false-prophets?sp=1&sq=Susanna%2520Mitchell

    Brexit and the spectre of NHS US sell-off: Americanised healthcare in the UK – after our exit from the EU – would only benefit global corporations
    http://camdennewjournal.com/article/brexit-and-spectre-of-nhs-us-sell-off?sp=1&sq=Susanna%2520Mitchell

    Deep cuts operation threatens the NHS: The sneaking privatisation of the NHS will lead to the closure of hospitals and the loss of jobs
    http://camdennewjournal.com/article/deep-cuts-operation-threatens-nhs-2?sp=1&sq=Susanna%2520Mitchell

    Phone app that could destroy our GP system: A private company being promoted by government to recruit patients to its doctor service spells ruin for the whole-person integrated care we need from our NHS
    http://camdennewjournal.com/article/phone-app-gp?sp=1&sq=Susanna%2520Mitchell

     

    Comments Off on Why the UK failed the pandemic test
    A deserved boost in pay for NHS staff, who have battled through the pandemic, is ‘the elephant in the room’ in the latest plan for the health service in England, Unite, Britain and Ireland’s largest union, said today (Thursday 30 July).
    Health and social care secretary Matt Hancock today welcomed the launch of the NHS People Plan as a new bureaucracy busting drive, so staff can spend less time on paperwork and more time with their patients.
     
    Unite, which has 100,000 members in the health service, said that the aims of this latest plan for the NHS would be hampered by the fragmentation caused by the 2012 Health and Social Care Act with its remit for increased competition for NHS services.
    Unite national officer for health Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe said: “There have been a plethora of plans for the future of the NHS over the years and this latest manifestation neatly avoids ‘the elephant in the room’ – that of NHS pay.
    “NHS staff have worked ceaselessly throughout the pandemic at great risk to themselves and a generous pay rise would recognise that dedication as well as staunch the ‘recruitment and retention’ crisis that is currently afflicting the NHS – for example, there are about 40,000 nursing vacancies in England alone.
    “It is all very well for the plan to trumpet bureaucracy busting measures, but it was the flawed 2012 Act of the then health secretary Andrew Lansley that created the extra bureaucracy by fragmenting the NHS in the first place.
    “One of the key chapters of the People Plan is ‘belonging to the NHS’. This terms rings hollow to thousands of health visitors and school nurses cast outside the NHS; or the catering, cleaning, portering and maintenance staff that have been outsourced to private contractors or dispensed to wholly owned subsidiaries.
    “The English ideological obsession with marketisation and privatisation in the NHS must be terminated without delay and this report does nothing to address this.
    “We, of course, welcome such measures in the plan as boosting the mental health and cancer workforce; full risk assessments for vulnerable staff, including BAEM workers; and all jobs to be advertised with flexible working options from January.
    “But without addressing the issue of pay, highly skilled NHS staff will consider looking for more lucrative work elsewhere, possibly abroad.”
    Last week, chancellor Rishi Sunak awarded up to a 3.1 per cent pay rise for 900,000 public sector workers, including doctors, teachers and police officers. Unite accused the chancellor of having ‘a selective memory’ when it comes to public sector pay, rewarding some, but ignoring hundreds of thousands of others.

    Unite senior communications officer Shaun Noble

    Comments Off on Pay is ‘elephant in the room’, says Unite, as new NHS England People Plan launched

    On Friday 24 July 2020 HIV i-Base published the sixth COVID-19 supplement to HIV Treatment Bulletin (HTB). Please see this link.

    All i-Base reports are free to copy and i-Base encourages wide distribution. Please credit i-Base when distributing these reports.

    This is a slightly expanded issue of HTB that covers both AIDS 2020 and related virtual meetings plus a fair number of COVID-19 developments that seemed too important to leave out. It is a mixed compilation, but hopefully useful.

    This edition of HTB includes reports from the virtual AIDS 2020 conference and linked satellite meetings on COVID-19.

    The main heading news from AIDS 2020 included continued reductions in the signal concerning dolutegravir and neural tube defects, further results on weight gain from the ADVANCE study, cabotegravir as PrEP in HPTN 083, and an early report of HIV remission.

    As the introduction to these reports shows, interacting with the virtual conference was not always easy. Although we include links to the site in our reports, the site will only be open access (without registration) after 27 July 2020. 

    The difficult website was reflected in overall attendance. Even when watching live events (and many were missed due to technical problems with the site), more than 2000 delegates were rarely online (when more than 20,000 people usually attend).

    Many of the satellite workshops are easier to find and watch, and we include reports from the COVID-19 workshop on HCV drugs to treat COVID-19 and an update on remdesivir. As with the AIDS 2020 website, many of the webcasts and posters are now offline.

    The rest of this extended issue includes both HIV reports and a continued focus on COVID-19.

    For all the hope that coverage of COVID-19 might be less needed, this issue contains another 12 pages about coronavirus. Many important developments come from UK research – including new treatments, immune response, race and ethnicity and vaccines.

    Comments Off on HIV i-Base publish the sixth COVID-19 supplement to HTB
    The damning report by MPs into hospital patients in England being discharged into care homes without a Covid-19 test reinforces the need for a public inquiry, sooner rather than later, into the government’s handling of the pandemic, Unite, Britain and Ireland’s largest union, said today (Wednesday 29 July).
    The influential cross-party Public Accounts Committee (PAC) accused ministers of being slow to support social care during the crisis. The initial decision to allow untested patients into care homes was an ‘appalling error’.
    Unite assistant general secretary Gail Cartmail said: “The committee’s findings are a welcome first step, but MPs need to dig deeper into the long-standing crisis in social care.
    “Covid-19 has heightened attention on the underlying shortcomings in the social care system that have been building up for decades.
    “The pain and distress of families whose elderly relatives died in care homes because of the government’s flawed policy will be forever etched in the nation’s memory.
    “We need swift government action on the broken business model, so prevalent in the world of privatised care, with measures to tackle the underpayment of the workforce and, what Unite members tell us, measures to address the inadequate training they receive in such areas as infection control.
    “The social care sector is predicated on an environment of insecure work leading to multiple work placements.
    “The workforce needs job security, decent pay that recognises their skills and assurances on the basics, such as adequate PPE and sanitation provisions.
    “There also needs to be a safeguarding structure for workers disproportionately at risk, such as those from the BAEM communities.
    “Today, Unite repeats its call for a public inquiry into the government’s handling of the pandemic.
    “This inquiry should happen, sooner rather than later, as we suspect that Boris Johnson wants to play for time before such an inquiry is set-up as it will expose the lamentable failings of his government during this national emergency which has seen more than 45,000 lives lost to Covid-19.”
    The PAC said about 25,000 patients were discharged into care homes in England between mid-March and mid-April to free up hospital beds. After initially saying a negative result was not required before discharging patients, the government then said in mid-April all patients would be tested.

    Unite senior communications officer Shaun Noble

    Comments Off on Unite renews call for pandemic public inquiry, following MPs’ report into untested patients discharged to care homes
    Unite NHS members will be at the forefront of a march to Downing Street tomorrow (Wednesday 29 July) to show their anger at being overlooked in the latest round of public sector pay rises – despite more than 500 NHS and social care staff dying from Covid-19.
    The Unite branch at Guy’s and St Thomas Hospital will be marching to Downing Street at 18.00 tomorrow from St Thomas Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH to protest at the government’s decision to put off a pay rise for NHS staff until April next year – when the three year pay deal comes to an end. The march will be attended and supported by NHS staff across London.
    Last week, chancellor Rishi Sunak awarded up to a 3.1 per cent pay rise for 900,000 public sector workers, including doctors, teachers and police officers. Unite accused the chancellor of having ‘a selective memory’ when it comes to public sector pay, rewarding some, but ignoring hundreds of thousands of others.
    Unite national officer for health Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe said: “Nursing staff and other allied health professionals have reacted with anger to being overlooked when pay rises were given to many in the public sector last week and the government not hearing the health trade unions’ call to bring their pay rise forward from April 2021.
    “This sense of anger was heightened, especially in light of their work and sacrifices during the global pandemic which has taken the lives of more than 500 NHS and social care staff across the UK.
    “We are facing a perfect storm for recruitment and retention in the NHS – in a decade of Tory austerity, NHS staff have seen their pay cut by 20 per cent in real terms and many are considering leaving the health service; at the same time, there are about 40,000 nursing vacancies in England alone.
    “This crisis is also being exacerbated by the scrapping of the student bursary, which is putting off many who may have considered becoming one of the next generation of nurses.
    “What we have seen in the last few months is generous praise, warm words, and lots of Thursday evening clapping by ministers; yet we got a flavour of the government’s true feelings with Rishi Sunak’s lack of a pay announcement for NHS staff last week, with no statement dealing with our call to move the pay of NHS workers forward.
    “The public expects – and ministers should deliver – a substantial pay increase for NHS staff that reflects their real worth to the NHS and society more generally. NHS workers shouldn’t have to wait till April 2021.”
    Unite branch secretary at Guy’s and St Thomas Hospital Mark Boothroyd said: “We have called this demonstration to express the anger that so many of our members feel at the government’s derisory treatment of NHS staff.
    “After all our sacrifice during the pandemic, to exclude us from the pay deal and make us wait till April 2021 is a slap in the face, and our members are going to Downing Street to tell Boris Johnson this directly.”

     

    Comments Off on Anger over NHS pay sparks Downing Street march tomorrow

    The threat to cut health visitor and community nurse jobs in County Durham, while Covid-19 is still widespread, has been branded as ‘incomprehensible’ by Unite, Britain and Ireland’s largest union, today (Friday 24 July).

    Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust (HDFT), which is taking over the County Durham 0-25 family health service contract from 1 September, wants to axe about 37 whole time equivalents (WTEs), while the coronavirus is still widespread across the country.

    Although the HDFT also says it wants to employ 21 WTE new posts, there will be a net loss of 16 WTEs out of a workforce of about 230 WTEs.

    Unite lead officer for health in the north east Chris Daly said: “It is almost incomprehensible that when ‘public health’ is foremost in people’s minds because of coronavirus, Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust is swinging the jobs axe.

    “The vast majority of those being earmarked to lose their jobs are health visitors and school nurses – the very professionals at the public health frontline helping families with babies and young children, and children returning to school.

    “Disgracefully, the trust is consulting when staff, have been working flat-out throughout the Covid-19 crisis supporting very stressed families and young people. This flawed exercise is happening before the first wave of the pandemic is over and with the expectation that a second wave will hit this autumn and winter.

    “It is also very wrong that schools and GPs have not been told about the proposed cuts in school nurses. School staff returning in September will be phoning school nurses to come and help with children that they have not seen since March and who may be exhibiting worrying behaviours and dealing with distressing emotions.

    “We believe that already stretched GPs will be expected to pick up the shortfall in keeping babies, children and young people safe. However, there is a real risk that those most at risk may fall through the current safety net that HDFT seems intent on weakening.

    “This is not the time to reduce the health and school nurse provision for children and young people. However, it will be some time before the adverse impact of these cuts are brought into sharp relief.

    “The Durham country council should work with the trust to increase the funding for these essential frontline services. The long-term health of families is never enhanced by reducing the number of healthcare professionals.”

    Unite, which embraces the Community Practitioners’ and Health Visitors’ Association (CPHVA), will be making strong representations on behalf of its members before the consultation process ends on 31 July.

    Comments Off on Durham health visitor and school nurse job losses ‘incomprehensible’ with Covid-19 still prevalent, says Unite

    The BMA is urging the Government to ensure more people take advantage of routine vaccinations after a concerning fall in coverage rates in recent years.

    In a report published today, the Association says that many immunisation programmes have been disrupted because of the pandemic as the NHS focused on responding to immediate health concerns and now it’s imperative that they are re-started and that people are encouraged to be immunised.

    It also notes that childhood vaccination in particular has plummeted during this time – dropping by around a fifth in total – despite advice that childhood immunisation should continue during Covid-19.

    According to NHS Digital, and highlighted in this report, coverage for the first dose of the MMR vaccine in England was at 94.5% in 2018-19, down from 94.9% in 2017-18 and below the 95% target set by the World Health Organisation (WHO).

    The BMA’s report says that making people aware of the benefits of routine vaccinations, such as the MMR vaccine, is vital. This is not just for their wellbeing, but also when we consider worrying reports about a lack of confidence in a potential Covid-19 vaccine and the implications that could have for general uptake.

    Altogether, the BMA is calling for action to:

    • widen vaccine availability and target specific populations
    • ensure adequate funding to deliver fully resourced immunisation services
    • raise public awareness and understanding of immunisation programmes
    • ensure health service IT supports vaccine uptake
    • increase vaccine uptake among NHS workers

    Dr Peter English, BMA public health medicine committee chair, said: “It’s been incredibly worrying to watch the decline in vaccine rates in the UK over the past few years –  for example, we lost our ‘measles-free’ status in 2019 and the pandemic has of course meant even fewer vaccinations have been carried out as the NHS battled on all fronts to keep the virus at bay.

    “Routine vaccination is so important, and many doctors can remember a time without it. Vaccination against common but often serious ailments has changed the face of public health and are rightly ranked by WHO, alongside clean water, as the public health intervention which has had the greatest impact on the world’s health.

    “That’s why, as we recover from this pandemic, everything must be done to increase vaccine uptake – particularly as we head into flu season and vulnerable people are at greater risk of becoming ill.

    “This means not only making sure the public understands the importance of getting vaccinated, but also resourcing the health service with what it needs to deliver this; adequate funding for immunisation programmes, IT services, and encouraging staff to protect themselves too.

    “Health has never been more at the forefront of people’s minds, and the Government needs to utilise this as a matter of urgency – not just for the sake of the population now, but the generations that follow.”

    Oliver Fry

    The BMA is a trade union and professional association representing and negotiating on behalf of all doctors in the UK. A leading voice advocating for outstanding health care and a healthy population. An association providing members with excellent individual services and support throughout their lives.

    Posted on behalf of the BMA by Jean Hardiman Smith

    Comments Off on More people need to be encouraged to take up routine vaccinations as we recover from Covid-19, BMA warns

    The contact tracing programme in Wales is called “Test, Trace and Protect” (TTP) which emphasises the purpose of the exercise i.e to protect individuals, families and communities. This provides a better focus that “Test, Track and Trace” in England which seems to focus on the process rather than its purpose. The Welsh programme is firmly based on a partnership / public service model.

    The population of Wales is about 3.1 million people ( approx. 55.5 million in England ). The internal market have been abolished in the Welsh NHS over a decade ago. Health care is delivered through seven unitary health boards ( and specialist health trusts for cancer and ambulance service). The health boards are responsible for the planning and delivery of primary and secondary services within their population footprint. There is no “payment by results”.

    The health board geographical footprint is co-terminus with about 2-5 local councils. Partnership working between health boards and local authorities is delivered by Regional Partnership Boards – with improving, but variable, success.

    Public Health Wales covers all of the country. There are public health practitioners attached to each health board though there is some criticism that the service is over-centralised. Local authorities are responsible for Environmental Health.

    The care sector operates on a similar basis as England though means testing for services is more generous in Wales

    With the outbreak of Covid-19, the Welsh Government supported a four nations UK response. Along with all the administrations across the UK it went into “lockdown” at the same time. But has time has gone on it has taken a more cautious and distinctive approach compared to the Westminster. This approach has fairly substantial support in Wales.

    From the start the Welsh Government sought to mobilise a co-ordinated public sector response to the pandemic along with the voluntary sector. Support from the private sector was sought in the supply chain in areas such as PPE but otherwise scarcely involved in direct clinical or health roles.

    Public Health Wales, along with some health board and university capacity, was responsible for the initial testing regime. At first the Welsh Government chose not to avail of the private sector led Lighthouse Testing programme that was being launched in England until it could guarantee the results of the testing was made available.

    Like the rest of the UK, Wales had a hesitant start to the TTP process but things have now settled down. The service delivered on a three tier basis – national, regional and local.

    The Welsh Government and Public Health Wales are main players at a national level. They set out the broad framework, set standards and provide professional advice. There is a single national IT platform which felicitates the TTP programme. This allows a national overview and more coherent understanding of what is happening.

    Public Health Wales also provides the main testing facilities with some use being made of health board capacity and the Lighthouse laboratories. The present testing capacity is about 20,000 tests per day with about 5k being sourced via the Lighthouse capacity. However this capacity has never come close to being called upon with 3-5,000 tests typically done daily. About 50% of test results are available in 24 hours and 85% in 48 hours. The delays mainly arise in tests being undertaken in north Wales but this should be addressed as new capacity is being put in place to locally serve north Wales.

    The regional tier is co-terminus with health board boundaries and involves the health board and its partner local authorities along with input from Public Health Wales. The region supports and co-ordinates the local delivery of the programme. It also provides step-up and advice and support for front line workers.

    The health boards are now responsible for the setting up the testing services across their patch. These samples are taken and transferred on to Public Health Wales ( or the other involved laboratories) to undertake the tests. The test results are usually texted to patients. There in on-line access to the test service.

    The local tier provides the front-line contact tracing service through local government Environmental Health officers and local government employees who have been transferred from other duties due to the pandemic. Some teams will also have some health authority staff. The tracing teams operate roughly at a Upper Super Output Area level (about 30-50,000 population). There are about 600 workers involved at the moment but is possible that 1,600 may be required depending on the level of demand.

    In Wales, during the period from 1st June to 21 June, 1,905 positive cases were referred to local and regional contact tracing teams. This is now down to about 100 referrals per week.

    At the moment over 85% of index cases have been contacted by these local contact teams with over 90% of contacts have been reached and advised. The local knowledge of the contact tracers is felt to be an important advantage in delivering the programme. As well, local government’s involvement allows for the provision a range of local support services where needed.

    Prior to the launch of the main contact tracing programme the Welsh Government undertook a pilot exercise to across different parts of the Wales to identify potential problems. This has allowed the main programme be launched fairly smoothly.

    To the middle of July the number of fatalities in Wales is in lower single figures with no deaths on some days – down from a daily peak of 43 in early April. There are less than 30 new cases daily a reduction from a peak of 391.

    Plans are also being developed to boost the Welsh GP viral surveillance programme with the target of covering 20% of the population. This should provide improved sero-surveillance across Wales to provide an early alert system as we face the risk of a second wave of Covid-19.

    Compared to some other parts of the UK, the Welsh Test, Trace and Protect scheme has attracted public confidence and support. The Welsh Government aspires to eradicating the virus as far as is possible but it recognises that its long, much used border with England means that not all the necessary levers are at its disposal. It also acknowledges that the lack of adequate welfare benefit support from Westminster for those who have to isolate due to Covid-19 infection or through being contacts is an avoidable vulnerability in the campaign to contain and eradicate the virus.

    2 Comments
    Kay Marshall (from AVAC) and Richard Jefferys (from TAG) call on organisations working in health and social care to sign in support of their statement on human challenge studies for COVID-19 vaccine development.

    Richard Jefferys writes:
    TAG and AVAC are circulating this statement and seeking endorsements from organizations that agree with our position:  https://forms.gle/xatyJBaePmbh25Pw7
    As background, challenge trials involve deliberate exposure to a pathogen in order to test vaccines. Typically they involve pathogens for which treatments are available (malaria challenge studies are probably the best known example). A human challenge with SARS-CoV-2 would obviously be very different given the lack of effective treatments and the poorly understood potential consequences of infection, even in young people. Our prior joint statement is available at: https://www.avac.org/press-release/statement-ethical-conduct-challenge-studies
    And guiding principles for when challenge studies might be considered are here: https://bit.ly/2CE8slz
    Please share the statement with any contacts who might be interested, and feel free to get in touch with any questions.
    Thanks,
    Richard

    About AVAC: Founded in 1995, AVAC is a non-profit organization that uses education, policy analysis, advocacy and a network of global collaborations to accelerate the ethical development and global delivery of HIV prevention options as part of a comprehensive response to the pandemic. For more information, visit www.avac.org.

    About TAG: Treatment Action Group (TAG) is an independent, activist and community-based research and policy think tank fighting for better treatment, prevention, a vaccine and a cure for HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis C virus. TAG works to ensure that all people with HIV, TB and HCV receive lifesaving treatment, care and information. We are science-based treatment activists working to expand and accelerate vital research and effective community engagement with research and policy institutions. For more information, visit www.treatmentactiongroup.org.

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    The UK-CAB is the UK’s HIV treatment advocates network.
     
    A couple of weeks ago four UK-CAB members spoke to Dr Rageshri Dhairyawan from Barts Health NHS Trust. It was a chance for HIV positive people from BAME communities to voice their concerns about the coronavirus pandemic. The strong focus was on questions from people living with HIV and the communities they work in.

    Watch via YouTube: https://youtu.be/Cy7d7FD2ro0

    The recording is about 40 minutes long. It covers a wide range of questions in relation to COVID-19. Discussion covers inequalities in health care, sexual health, mental health, research, stigma and HIV treatment. 

     

    We hope this film provides an educational tool for doctors and the public. Please share it with people accessing your services, clients, partners, and friends and families. 


    Thank you to Adela, Jide, Juddy and Shamal for taking part and to Jo for chairing this session, and of course to Dr Rageshri for answering these important questions.
     
    And, here is Dr Ameen Kamlana in a very short interview with Sky News on how COVID-19 is disproportionately affecting people of colour.
    Comments Off on COVID-19: BAME communities living with HIV and a short interview with Dr Ameen Kamlana