Blog

  • Categories
  • Category Archives: Clinical conditions

    This paper was developed by a group of primary care clinicians for the Labour Shadow Health Team at their request. We hope it helps illuminate the next steps for primary care.

    WHAT ARE THE RISKS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES FACING  PRIMARY CARE PROVISION DURING AND AFTER ITS RETURN  TO A NORMAL STATE OF OPERATION?

     

    “We will be facing some tough challenges over at least the next year: managing more consultations (and clinical risk) remotely by phone or video; catching up with resurgent patient demand, catching up with the care of long-term conditions (whilst trying to protect groups of vulnerable people from a continuing threat of Covid); managing a backlog of people who need to be referred; and coping with any spikes in Covid. This comes on top of the usual (preceding) strains on limited resources and lengthening ‘winter pressures.’ I don’t think that we will be seen as ‘NHS heroes’ in a few months!”

     

    DIGITAL WORKING IS TRANSFORMING CARE

    Opportunities

    • Easier and more flexible for people and practices, so may aid GP recruitment
    • The complex and subtle nature of the consultation seems to be maintained
    • Communication across sectors can be dramatically improved. One GP described helping a patient with lymphoma – in 10mins he was able to include a Ca nurse and consultant in a conversation with the patient.
    • Telephone triage also successful
    • Bricks and mortar general practice may become less necessary
    • Combining online personalised advice with online access to records opens the way to improved self-care

    Challenges:

    • Digital can widen inequalities and disenfranchise. Experience suggests it is the elderly rather than the poor who struggle the most.
    • The best balance between remote and face-to-face is unclear. Video may be best for follow-ups.
    • Video is seldom preferred by people. The telephone or face to face are most popular.

    Actions:

    • Support the elderly to become more digitally able while ensuring that traditional approaches remain available
    • Support digital cross-sector working: GP/hospital/Social Care
    • Encourage digital mentoring to improve self-care for people with LTCs

     

    SHIFTING TO PROACTIVE WORK WITH COMMUNITIES

    Opportunities

    • The spontaneous rise in mutual community organisations has been remarkable, often outwith the traditional voluntary sector, improving safeguarding and perhaps saving lives.
    • Primary care has been able to embrace that.
    • It offers a model for the future
    • There have been many examples of successful cooperation with communities, but they have been dependent on local circumstances and local heroes.
    • The health gain comes when communities can take more control over the area and their lives
    • The NHS and local government need to create the conditions whereby communities can work collaboratively with the statutory sector sharing decisions with their communities. We need a systematic approach for mobilising civil society, working with NHS and LAs.
    • PCNs offer a good base for such cross-sector working

    Challenges:

    • Sharing decisions with communities is a difficult skill the NHS would have to learn, perhaps from LAs and housing associations.
    • Building on existing work and with councillors would be essential. No new unnecessary initiatives.

    Actions:

    • Jointly fund, via NHS and LA, community development workers in each PCN, working with social prescribers. They would support the statutory sector sharing decisions with their communities.
    • Primary Care to be encouraged to support community groups and community development by, for instance, enabling practice space to be used by communities.
    • Asset mapping with LA and PH colleagues would be one early step
    • Encourage and incentivise cross-sector working.

     

    PRIMARY CARE TO ACTIVELY WORK ON THE SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH AND HEALTH INEQUALITIES

    These have been thrown into sharp relief through the pandemic.

    Opportunities

    • Essential to make any progress on health improvement
    • Community development can assist
    • Local work on poverty, race issues, migrant issues, housing
    • Cross-sector working is essential to do this.

    Challenges

    • The independent contractor status of general practice may hinder this process.
    • Cross-sector working is difficult
    • It is political work

    Actions

    • Promote training GPs with a Special Interest in Public Health, sitting astride the PCN and LA
    • Support areas to become Marmot towns.
    • PCNs to link formally with LAs
    • Boost the status and effectiveness of Well-Being Boards
    • Borough-level linking (not merging) of LAs and NHS.

     

    PRIMARY CARE AND LONG-TERM CONDITIONS INC COVID

    Opportunities

    • The importance of community service provision has been made plain by the pandemic
    • Extensive primary care services and rehab re likely to be required for people recovering from Covid

    Challenges

    • Managing more serious illnesses outside hospital may require differently trained primary care staff such as District Nurses

    Actions:

    • Use a range of approaches to contact those who have delayed seeking help for potentially life-threatening illnesses
    • Digital self-care with remote links to home monitoring such as BP, weight, Peak Flows
    • Secondary care doing remote consultations to reduce the backlog
    • Explore a range of differently skilled staff for primary care

     

    RELAXATION OF RULES HAS BEEN HELPFUL

    Opportunities  

    • There has been relaxation of some bureaucracy
    • Flexible approaches have enabled doctors to return to the workforce.
    • These changes have enabled GPs to devote more time to patient care.

    Challenges

    • Some of this bureaucracy is useful. We don’t want wholesale deregulation: that has often been dangerous
    • It is difficult to know which parts need to be kept and which don’t.

    Actions

    • Explore with the profession which regulatory aspects need to be kept and which don’t.

     

    FUNDING, TRAINING AND STAFFING

    Challenges

    • Primary care, GPs, HVs and DNs remain substantially understaffed. This must change.
    • Different training requirements may be needed for a different future.
    • The RCN is calling for wage increases for nurses

    Actions:

    • A system to support on-going review and remodelling of workforce capacity is needed to ensure that the primary care workforce is responsive to emerging need which may increase over time.
    • Clarification of plans for student health visitors and others who have had their training disrupted during the pandemic

     

    STAFF SAFETY IN THE TIME OF COVID

    • Continued need for PPE to protect staff and patients
    • Mental health support for staff

     

    PRIMARY CARE BUILDINGS

    Challenges:

    • Many primary care buildings were inadequate before Covid
    • Many more now need redesign to cope with new patient flows and requirements for cleaning etc

    Actions:

    • Funding must be found where premises need improving
    • Consider links with housing associations

     

    BOOSTING DEMOCRACY IN THE NHS

    Challenges

    • The NHS has used the Coronavirus Act to push through significant changes to the infrastructure of ICSs. This is baking in the risks posed by them: privatisation, fragmentation and cuts.
    • Hosp reconfigurations are happening rapidly without consultation and no equality assessment

    Actions

    • Call out these dangerous changes and use them to explore new approaches to democracy. For instance:
      • PCNs run with a Board with a broad representation of opinion
      • Link PCNs and local government through local forums with budgets – a form of participatory budgeting
      • Community development would assist participatory democracy

     

    ADVANCED CARE PLANNING

    Opportunities

    • Advanced care planning will need to sensitively change for the better.
    • General practice is well- placed to have discussions that allow patients to express their wishes, which will reduce unnecessary and possibly undignified hospital admissions.

    Challenges

    • There seemed to be sporadic inappropriate behaviour from CCGs and practices issuing blanket DNR notices to care homes
    • The pandemic seemed to cast a harsh light on relationships between some practices and care homes

    Actions:

    • Patients suitable for advanced care planning conversations could be identified— perhaps informed by frailty scores — and discussed in multidisciplinary meetings as part of routine care.
    • The public need to be involved, and the sector need to emphasise that these discussions are about providing quality of care.

     

    SOURCES:

    https://www.rcn.org.uk/news-and-events/blogs/covid-19-out-of-this-crisis-we-must-build-a-better-future-for-nursing

     

    https://ihv.org.uk/our-work/publications-reports/health-visiting-during-covid-19-an-ihv-report/

     

    A brave new world: the new normal for general practice after the COVID-19 pandemic.

    https://bjgpopen.org/content/early/2020/06/01/bjgpopen20X101103

     

    https://www.rcgp.org.uk/policy/fit-for-the-future.aspx

     

    CONTRIBUTORS

    Dr Onkar Sahota

    Dr Duncan Parker

    Dr Joe McManners

    Dr Robbie Foy

    Dr Brian Fisher

     

    CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

    Dr Fisher:

    I am Clinical Director of a software company called Evergreen Life www.evergreen-life.co.uk . We are accredited by the NHS to enable people to access for free online their GP records, to book appointments and order repeat prescriptions. We try to help people stay as fit and well as possible.

    Comments Off on SHA Briefing – Primary Care

    This is a collective statement on behalf of SHA bringing together public health evidence and other opinions on a key Covid policy issue.

    The government ‘s centralised programme in England for testing and tracing – and the use of outsourcing

    1. Key messages:

    • The Government has not yet passed the five tests it set itself for easing lockdown
    • The government said that it would only consider easing lockdown once the country has passed five tests. One of these tests [TEST 5] is “confidence that we can avoid a second peak of infection that overwhelms the NHS”
    • The Devolved Administrations and many scientists and public health professionals doubt whether or not we have “passed this test” They doubt we have the capacity to detect and respond to local surges in infection or control outbreaks as lockdown is eased – and that a second or even third peak of infection will occur. Policy is diverging across the UK with mixed messaging to the public and a high risk of losing a coherent and effective strategy of suppression.
    • To manage our “exit “from lock down we need to be able to recognise new cases when they occur, test and isolate people who are infected, trace and test their contacts – and to have the flexibility resource and leadership to organise responses at a local level.
    • Other countries in Europe are using phased lifting of measures, across regions and settings. The EU Roadmap states that “the lifting of measures should start with those with a local impact and be gradually extended to measures with a broader geographic coverage, taking into account national specificities. This would allow to take more effective action, tailored to local conditions where this is appropriate, and to re-impose restrictions as necessary, if a high number of new cases occurs (e.g. introducing a cordon sanitaire)” For example, why would there be a relaxation of control measures in dense urban areas with crowded public transport at the same time as some parts of the UK that have had no new confirmed cases for 18 plus days and some areas with very few cases? We need detailed stats and maps by district council of all new cases by area of residence over time (at a more granular level than unitary authorities) The Orkney Western isles and Shetland remain in lock down when they have had no cases for 18, 21 and 32 days respectively and when a cordon sanitaire could be put in place
    • Integrated response In order to lift measures while retaining control of the virus, we must identify cases rapidly, isolate and contact trace: so testing is crucial but we must have the ability to test the right people and to rapidly act on the results

    o Prevention of new cases is always better and much cheaper than critical care. Investment in hospitals to respond to COVID19 has been absolutely necessary but will always have less impact on population level health outcomes than control measures.

    o The UK has an excellent public health and primary care system, both of which have been eroded and underfunded in the last 10 years. There are skills and knowledge and capability in these that would provide an effective and efficient response to moving through the next phases of the pandemic, if invested in. However, both these sectors have been excluded and marginalised to the detriment of their local communities

    o For a “test, trace and isolate “ system of control and response to outbreaks to be effective, data must be shared and agencies need to work together at national , regional and local level , coordinate and integrate their response if it is to be effective .No one agency has the knowledge , skills, or resources to do this on their own – and Whitehall in particular needs to recognise that central control is bound to fail.

    o Capacity for testing should provide real time data to help monitor community transmission, link with contact tracing systems and enable local authorities to function autonomously, as well as part of a national response to this pandemic.

    o Much of the infrastructure for testing commissioned by the Government has been led centrally – much of it has been established from scratch. The original drivers for increasing testing capacity were to:

        1. Allow NHS staff to be released back to work on the front line and
        2. respond politically to the growing criticism about the UKs track record on testing o The plight of care homes and the huge death toll from COVID 19 in those institutions is a classic illustration of the failures, which result from over centralization and reliance on hierarchical control and power. This example also illustrates the potential of local government and effective leadership to understand and respond quickly to local circumstances, to innovate, and to “stitch systems “together and make them work.
    • Outsourcing in England Rather than invest or expand our existing laboratory system Ministers chose instead to outsource the provision of testing for COVID 19 in England. They used special powers to bypass normal tendering and award a string of multimillion pound contracts for delivering and processing tests to private companies such as Deloitte, Randox laboratories [£ 133 million] and involved big pharma companies such as GSK, Roche and AstraZeneca and university research teams in creating mega or “ Lighthouse “ labs. These organisations:
      1. Provide swab tests on hospital patients and COVID tests run by NHS labs and Public Health England.
      2. Collect swabs from NHS workers, social care staff and other key workers at 50 drive -in centres and 70 mobile units, which are processed and reported on through a network of 3 mega “lighthouse “ labs
      3. Send out home testing kits for eligible persons with coronavirus symptoms, aged 65 or over, or who cannot work from home
      4. Offer an “on -line portal “through which CQC registered care homes [65 +] can order test kits
      5. Issue serology and swab tests for ONS surveillance and research studies
    • Together Government claims that they can offer 100000 tests a day.

    o However when backlogs develop, they tend to operate as separate “ silos” as illustrated when 50000 tests were sent to the US rather than workload shared between them.

    o More importantly, this testing system does not provide or allow access to test data by local organisations or Public Health England.

    o More than half of tests by May12th have been done by outsourced companies and results are “disappearing into a black hole” A Health Service Journal analysis on May 13th said that recent government testing figures “suggests that in recent days around two thirds of tests have taken place under the commercial lab scheme, for which the data is not available locally. This includes more than 7,000 positive test results in the past three days, and tens of thousands over recent weeks”.

    o Most tests [except for care homes] are demand led, random in nature, and requested by individuals from a wide catchment area. As such, they do not provide useful information for detecting spikes or patterns of infection in a particular geographical area, local “hot spots” or for managing outbreaks. Furthermore, test data are not completely post coded nor are they analysed at a sub-regional or local authority level, local authorities and PHE have found it difficult to get hold of these data.

    • Real time analysis and assessment of infection

    o The Government proposes to establish a Joint Biosecurity Centre with an independent analytical function which will

    o a) provide real time analysis and assessment of infection outbreaks at a community level and collect a wide range of data to build a picture of COVID-19 infection rates across the country – from testing, environmental and workplace data to local infrastructure testing (e.g. swab tests)

    o b) have a response function that will advise on the overall prevalence of COVID-19, identify specific actions to address local spikes in infections, in partnership with local agencies and guide local actions through a clear set of protocols based on the best scientific understanding of COVID-19, and what effective local actions look like.

    o We welcome the commitment to ensure that the Joint Biosecurity Centre [JBC] works closely with local partners. We would like some input into the design of the data platform, as well as discussion about rights of data contributors to access all data sets, which are held.

    o We do not believe that the JBC should have a response function, which “guides local actions surges through a series of protocols. “

    o Lessons from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic about over centralisation and hierarchical control – delays, rigidity, lack of autonomy to act, failure to listen and respond to local intelligence need to be learnt.

    Once again, they have outsourced this analytical function to a large number of private sector organisations. The strategy states that NHS England and NHS improvement have total control over access to all NHS test data will guide and inform the COVID 19 response during lock down – but so far they have not consulted local authorities or PHE about the proposal to create this JBC or involved them in the design, access and linkage to this data store. NHS England has created difficulties and even stopped local agencies from having access to important data sets, such as 111 calls.

    o Contact tracing: Contact tracing at scale can help reduce onward transmission during release from lockdown, if properly resourced by skilled people and well organised. It is unclear how their trace and track system will be integrated with the testing system.

    We are concerned that the Government has

      1. outsourced the call centre to SERCO given its previous track record [breast cancer catch up]
      2. believe that one hour of training as call handler will be sufficient to run this online and phone based contact tracing system,
      3. place so much reliance on an experimental App for contact tracing.
      4. recruited insufficient skilled contact tracers to impact on the “R” number, not made sufficient effort to recruit people with experience of contact tracing e.g. EHOs or retired professionals to the clinical team.

    The government states that for its test and trace system to work, several systems need to be built and successfully integrated. These include:

        • widespread swab testing with rapid turn-around time, digitally-enabled to order the test and securely receive the result certification;
        • local authority public health services to bring a valuable local dimension to testing, contact tracing and support to people who need to self-isolate;
        • automated, app-based contact-tracing through the new NHS COVID-19 app to (anonymously) alert users when they have been in close contact with someone identified as having been infected;

    Conclusions

    o The Testing and Tracing infrastructure which the government has commissioned has been largely been outsourced to private sector organisations and very centralised

    o As such it is a “quick fix which is poorly designed and ill equipped to support the next stage of controlling this pandemic and involving the many agencies which need to play their part as lockdown are eased.

    o The considerable investment which has been made in these new “ temporary “ structures should be channelled over the next 2 to 3 years into building a more robust, flexible , resilient and multilevel , public health and primary care systems , capable of responding to pandemics in the future.

    Sources

    Posted by Brian Fisher on behalf of the Policy Team.

     

    Comments Off on Briefing Topic 3 – Test, Trace, outsourcing
    • Latest national agreement will see firefighters train care staff in infection, prevention and control
    • Request for help came from senior health officials in England

    Firefighters have been called in to deliver special infection, prevention and control (IPC) training packages to care home staff in a move that is hoped will help to halt the spread of coronavirus in the sector.

    Under the new measure, firefighter volunteers will train care home staff directly on IPC procedures, the “donning and doffing” of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), hygiene measures, hand cleaning, and how to safely carry out COVID-19 tests. Designated care home staff will also be taught how to carry out the same training for their colleagues.

    The agreement will allow support to be provided to nursing and care homes, domiciliary care, supported independent living and sheltered accommodation.

    England’s Chief Nursing Officer and Director of Community Health requested the work, which was followed by a letter from the Westminster Fire Minister.

    While the request only came from the Westminster government, the agreement allows firefighters across the UK to support care staff subject to local negotiation. Local resilience forums, care homes and NHS clinical commissioning groups can now write to their fire and rescue service to request the support.

    It builds on firefighters’ work face-fitting PPE masks for frontline NHS and care staff, delivering PPE and medical supplies to NHS and care facilities, and assisting in taking COVID-19 test samples.

    Firefighters have now signed up to a total of 14 new areas of work including moving dead bodies, driving ambulances, and delivering food and medicines to vulnerable people.

    The agreement contains a number of measures to prevent cross-infection between vulnerable individuals, care home staff and firefighters. Firefighters will take measures to prevent clothing and equipment that may have been exposed to the virus from contaminating fire engines, including using sterilised safety bags.

    All those volunteering for the work will need appropriate training, PPE, and high standards of hygiene and social distancing must be carried out. Services will need to follow a generic risk assessment, provided by the FBU, NFCC, and National Employers.

    More than 11,000 people have died due to coronavirus in UK care homes with the government coming under fierce criticism for allowing infections to spread through the sector.

    Matt Wrack, FBU general secretary, said:

    “The crisis in care homes is a national scandal but our members will do what they can to help. Firefighters, highly trained in the safe use of PPE and infection prevention and control, can provide vital support at this difficult time.

    “We’re coming into wildfire season and can expect an incredibly busy few months for firefighters. But, nonetheless, crews have taken on extraordinary new areas of work to support their communities through this pandemic.

    “While firefighters are here to help care staff and residents through this crisis, we must be clear that it should never have come to this. The government has disgracefully mishandled this pandemic, allowing the virus to spread into care homes unchecked – and thousands have paid with their lives.

    Media contacts

    Joe Karp-Sawey, FBU communications officer

    FBU press office
    press@fbu.org,uk

    • The full agreement between the FBU, NFCC, and National Employers is available here: 2020 may 22 – tripartite 7 – final minus hyperlink.pdf
    • This is the latest of fourteen new areas of work detailed in the full agreement
    • Under previous agreements, firefighters can now construct vital protective face shields for NHS and care staff, drive ambulances in parts of the country, will also now begin transferring both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients from Nightingale hospitals: https://www.fbu.org.uk/news/2020/04/24/firefighters-make-face-shields-health-and-care-staff-and-transfer-patients-and
    • Firefighters are now permitted to assist ambulance services in some specified activities and drive ambulances; deliver food and medicines to vulnerable people; and, in the case of mass casualties due to COVID-19, move dead bodies.
    • Firefighters can also fit face masks and deliver vital PPE and medical supplies to NHS and care staff; take samples for COVID-19 antigen tests; drive ambulances to non-emergency outpatient appointments and to transport those in need of urgent care; and to train non-emergency service personnel to drive ambulances: https://www.fbu.org.uk/news/2020/04/16/coronavirus-firefighters-now-allowed-carry-out-antigen-tests
    • The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) is the professional and democratic voice of firefighters and other workers within fire and rescue services across the UK. The general secretary is Matt Wrack
    • The FBU is on Twitter: @fbunational and Facebook: facebook.com/FireBrigadesUnion1918
    If you would like to stop receiving emails from this sender, simply unsubscribe.

     

    2020 may 22 – tripartite 7 – final minus hyperlink.pdf

    Comments Off on COVID-19: Firefighters called in to help stem spread of infection in care homes
    Unite national officer for health Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe said: “Pressures on our ambulance members are unprecedented with the profession not currently being given the correct guidance as to whom they should take to hospital.
    “They are also not being given the correct level of personal protective equipment (PPE) if they suspect a patient has Covid-19.  Ambulance workers are putting their health, perhaps their lives, at risk, by not receiving the correct PPE and also by not receiving the correct fit test training to wear the PPE. 
    “On top of this, the lack of testing remains a stark and very serious issue – there are not enough tests to ensure ambulance staff are tested within the five-day window for testing.”
    “Unite is urgently calling for ambulance workers to be given clear guidance regarding triaging which patients should be taken to hospital and more action on PPE which needs to be supplied to paramedics, so they are able to do their essential duties.
    “Paramedics are terrified of making the wrong call and being sanctioned for this.
    “I think the public’s patience with ministers is wearing very thin as they continue to say that there is enough PPE in the system, when there are numerous reports from frontline staff that this is simply not the case.
    “It is humbling to see social media posts which show some NHS and social care staff risking their lives as they go to care for patients with coronavirus. The situation is even more dire in social care settings, as care staff do their utmost for the elderly with inadequate protective kit.
    “Unite has thousands of members who are part of the healthcare science workforce. These talented staff need to be engaged to provide the test that is required to ensure 100,000 people can be tested a day. 
    “Unite has over 100,000 members in the health and social care services and we will not rest until we ensure that all health and social care workers are secure in their individual roles in keeping us all safe and well – we are campaigning for that goal 24/7.
    “If these objectives are not met and NHS staff continue not to be protected, reluctantly NHS and social care staff could legitimately and lawfully decline to put themselves in further danger and risk of injury at work. Unite will defend NHS and social care staff.”

    Unite senior communications officer Shaun Noble

    Comments Off on Unite statement on coronavirus – and its impact on paramedics and other NHS workers and social care staff
    1. On PPE. From a Greater Manchester doctor working on a respiratory ward, unofficially renamed by staff the “Coronavirus Ward”, about protective equipment:

    “It’s not so much whether there’s enough, it’s what’s being brought in is really poor quality and advice about what constitutes PPE  is changing daily. Loads of my colleagues have already tested positive…… that’s one good thing my hospital is really on it with testing staff.”

    1. From a Unison rep in NHS Greater Manchester:

    “I am worried about members with diabetes, especially type 1. First of all they were listed in the ‘at risk’ group, not quite as at risk as the ‘vulnerable’ group, but who should still not be asked to work. Now they are being asked to go in. The responsibility has been put on them to observe the recommendations. They are sent on to wards where it is impossible to keep a 2m distance from patients, and PPE is still a problem.”

    And “there are not enough tests for the virus. But it would be possible to identify people with symptoms, and teams could be recruited to monitor symptoms and track contacts. However this is not happening.”

    1. Care workers are also on the Frontline. From a care worker in Scotland who visits patients in their homes. She was very upset because she was not allowed to shop at the time reserved for NHS staff “because she had the wrong uniform”. She has been working double shifts for a month, and will be doing so until July, and at the same time doing shopping for some of her patients, elderly people unable to get out of the house and whose adult children live too far away to help. This has been made more difficult by not being treated as a frontline worker, especially as there are limited occasions when she can do shopping, given her extra workload. She points out she is risking her life and those of her family members, but not being treated as “frontline”.

     

    1. Terror of the Unknown. From another Greater Manchester doctor, a retired consultant: “I have been retraining, but will be back at work full time on Monday. The main thing I noticed last week was the atmosphere of fear amongst the staff. Our hospital are pretty organised, it seems to me, with training and equipment, but not unexpectedly, there is terror of the unknown.”

     

    1. Ventilators and Tory Donors. Andrew Raynor of MEC Medical submitted an application to help the government on 16th March, but “nothing” happened. They are a worldwide supplier of oxygen therapy, suction, flow meters, electric suction, regulators and more. Raynor said the government had, instead, “ploughed loads of money into big consortiums to try and make a cheap, makeshift ventilator”. He did not have a problem with the government wanting to make a cheaper ventilator, but pointed out that his firm was already a ventilator manufacturer, and could “upscale quicker”.

    Instead, on 26 March, the BBC reported that the government had ordered 10,000 ventilators from the vacuum cleaner firm Dyson, which has no experience making the ventilators required. Dyson, working with medical technology firm, The Technology Partnership, has “hundreds of engineers working round the clock to design the ventilators from scratch.” The BBC commented that even if a suitable prototype was produced as a result, it still had to get regulatory approval, and move to production on a significant scale.

    As an anaesthetist commented to us: “simple ventilators allow you to dial in the tidal volume (the amount of air moved into or out of the lungs during each ventilation cycle), the respiratory rate” and the concentration of oxygen being breathed in. The ventilators deliver all the breaths and can be used during surgery or for transferring patients.” That is, for short term ventilation.

    But after several days on these ventilators, usually necessary for Covid-19 patients, “people develop wasting and loss of condition in the muscles responsible for breathing in. This means that patients need to be supported during this time, but support can be gradually reduced as they begin to recover muscle strength and can take progressively larger breaths. “They usually also need a temporary tracheostomy to reduce the amount of dead space, enabling lighter sedation and more effective breathing.”

    However, the Dyson ventilators are very basic and do not allow for weaning of the ventilator. “But he’ll make a lot of money, get a peerage, and make it look like Matt Hancock is doing something.”

    In contrast, “modern Intensive Care Unit ventilators are expensive and take ages to produce. Hancock just wanted a soundbite and a photo-opportunity. He passed over offers from established manufacturers to award contracts to big name companies like JCB and Dyson, with no experience of ventilator production, but owned by Tory donors.”

    Our informant compares the finger-prick antibody tests that Hancock has ordered. “They are totally unreliable, with low sensitivity and specificity, but home testing makes for a good, eye-catching headline, even if it’s a waste of time and money. Hancock is a joke; he is surrounded by sycophants and yes-men at the DHSC.”

    Obviously the production of much-needed ventilators is welcome. But the Government’s choice of manufacturers raises major questions about whether it has prioritised its friends and donors, rather than the specification of the ventilators needed.

    Blog from Vivien Walsh

    Comments Off on News From the Frontline
    Unite national officer for health Colenzo Jarrett-Thorpe said: “At this time of national emergency caused by the coronavirus pandemic, it is right that the legal protections covering whistleblowers in the NHS are highlighted.
    “Unite, which has 100,000 members in the health service, will be monitoring the situation very closely in the weeks ahead and will give maximum support to any member who may face disciplinary procedures as a result of raising legitimate concerns, for example, the lack of personal protective equipment (PPE).
    “The current legislation protecting whistleblowers has been further underpinned by the NHS Staff Council statement of 28 February and the English Social Partnership Forum statement on 1 April.
    “Any NHS worker that suspects they are being victimised for whistleblowing should contact their ‘freedom to speak up’ guardian which every trust in England should have in place. If they are a union member, they should contact their workplace representative or local union office.
    “There have been anecdotal stories on social media that some NHS bosses may have been clamping down on those wishing to expose failings in the system and improve the well-being of patients. If we discover concrete evidence that this is happening, we will act immediately to support our members.”

    The NHS Staff Council statement of 28 February 2020

    https://www.nhsemployers.org/-/media/Employers/Documents/Pay-and-reward/NHS-Staff-Council—Guidance-for-Covid-19-Feb-20.pdf?la=en&hash=70C909DA995280B9FAE4BF6AF291F4340890445C&hash=70C909DA995280B9FAE4BF6AF291F4340890445C

    English Social Partnership Forum Joint Statement on Industrial relation – 1 April 2020

    https://www.socialpartnershipforum.org/media/166314/SPF-Covid-19-statement-final-and-formatted.pdf

    Protection for whistleblowers in the UK is provided under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA).The PIDA protects employees and workers who blow the whistle about wrongdoing.

    For more information please contact Unite senior communications officer Shaun Noble

    Email: shaun.noble@unitetheunion.org

    Twitter: @unitetheunion Facebook: unitetheunion1 Web: unitetheunion.org
    Unite is Britain and Ireland’s largest union with members working across all sectors of the economy. The general secretary is Len McCluskey.
    Comments Off on Unite statement on whistleblowing in the NHS during the coronavirus emergency

    The Socialist Health Association (SHA) published its first Blog on the COVID-19 pandemic last week (Blog 1 – 17th March 2020). A lot has happened over the past week and we will address some of these developments using the lens of socialism and health.

    1. Global crisis

    This is a pandemic, which first showed its potential in Wuhan in China in early December 2019. The Chinese government were reluctant to disclose the SARS- like virus to the WHO and wider world to start with and we heard about the courageous whistle blower Dr Li Wenliang, an ophthalmologist in Wuhan, who was denounced and subsequently died from the virus. The Chinese government recognised the risk of a new SARS like virus and called in the WHO and announced the situation to the wider world on the 31st December 2019.

    The starter pistols went off in China and their neighbouring countries and the risk of a global pandemic was communicated worldwide. The WHO embedded expert staff in China to train staff, guide the control measures and validate findings. Dr Li Wenliang who had contracted the virus, sadly died in early February and has now been exonerated by the State. Thanks to the Chinese authorities and their clinical and public health staff we have been able to learn about their control measures and the clinical findings and outcomes in scientific publications. This is a major achievement for science and evidence for public health control measures but….

    Countries in the Far East had been sensitised by the original SARS-CoV outbreak, which originated in China in November 2002. The Chinese government at that time had been defensive and had not involved the WHO early enough or with sufficient openness. The virus spread to Hong Kong and then to many countries showing the ease of transmission particularly via air travel. The SARS pandemic was thankfully relatively limited leading to global spread but ‘only’ 8,000 confirmed cases and 774 deaths. This new Coronavirus COVID-19 has been met by robust public health control measures in South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and Singapore. They have all shown that with early and extensive controls on travel, testing, isolating and quarantining that you can limit the spread and the subsequent toll on health services and fatalities. You will notice the widespread use of checkpoints where people are asked about contact with cases, any symptoms eg dry cough and then testing their temperature at arms length. All this is undertaken by non healthcare staff. Likely cases are referred on to diagnostic pods. In the West we do not seem to have put much focus on this at a population level – identifying possible cases, testing them and isolating positives.

    To look at the global data the WHO and the John Hopkins University websites are good. For a coherent analysis globally the Tomas Peoyu’s review  ‘Coronavirus: The Hammer and the dance’ is a good independent source as is the game changing Imperial College groups review paper for the UK Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE). This was published in full by the Observer newspaper on the 23rd March. That China, with a population of 1.4bn people, have controlled the epidemic with 81,000 cases and 3,260 deaths is an extraordinary achievement. Deaths from COVID-19 in Italy now exceed this total.

    The take away message is that we should have acted sooner following the New Year’s Eve news from Wuhan and learned and acted on the lessons of the successful public health control measures undertaken in China and the Far East countries, who are not all authoritarian Communist countries! Public Health is global and instead of Trump referring to the ‘Chinese’ virus he and our government should have acted earlier and more systematically than we have seen.

    Europe is the new epicentre of the spread and Italy, Spain and France particularly badly affected at this point in time. The health services in Italy have been better staffed than the NHS in terms of doctors/1000 population (Italy 4 v UK 2.8) as well as ITU hospital beds/100,000 (Italy 12.5 v UK 6.6). As we said in Blog 1 governments cannot conjure up medical specialists and nurses at whim so we will suffer from historically low medical staffing. The limited investment in ITU capacity, despite the 2009 H1N1 pandemic which showed the weakness in our system, is going to harm us. It was great to see NHS Wales stopping elective surgical admissions early on and getting on with training staff and creating new high dependency beds in their hospitals. In England elective surgery is due to cease in mid April! We need to ramp up our surge capacity as we have maybe 2 weeks at best before the big wave hits us. The UK government must lift their heads from the computer model and take note of best practice from other countries and implement lockdown and ramp up HDU/ITU capacity.

    In Blog 1 we mentioned that global health inequalities will continue to manifest themselves as the pandemic plays out and spare a thought for the Syrian refugee camps, people in Gaza, war torn Yemen and Sub Saharan Africa as the virus spreads down the African continent. Use gloves, wash your hands and self isolate in a shanty town? So let us not forget the Low Middle Income Countries (LMICs) with their weak health systems, low economic level, weak infrastructure and poor governance. International banking organisations, UNHCR, UNICEF, WHO and national government aid organisations such as DFID need to be resourced and activated to reach out to these countries and their people.

    1. The public health system

    We are lucky to have an established public health system in the UK and it is responding well to this crisis. However we can detect the impact of the last 10 years of Tory Party austerity which has underfunded the public health specialist services such as Public Health England (PHE) and the equivalents in the devolved nations, public health in local government and public health embedded in laboratories and the NHS. PHE has been a world leader in developing the PCR test on nasal and throat samples as well as developing/testing the novel antibody blood test to demonstrate an immune response to the virus. The jury is out as to what has led to the lack of capacity for testing for C-19 as the UK, while undertaking a moderate number of tests, has not been able to sustain community based testing to help guide decisions about quarantining key workers and get intelligence about the level of community spread. Compare our rates of testing with South Korea!

    We are lucky to have an infectious disease public health trained CMO leading the UK wide response who has had experience working in Africa. Decisions made at COBRA and announced by the Prime Minister are not simply based ‘on the science’ and no doubt there have been arguments on both sides. The CSO reports that SAGE has been subject to heated debate as you would expect but the message about herd immunity and stating to the Select Committee that 20,000 excess deaths was at this stage thought to be a good result was misjudged. The hand of Dominic Cummings is also emerging as an influencer on how Downing Street responds. Remember at present China with its 1.4bn population has reported 3,260 deaths. They used classic public health methods of identifying cases and isolating them and stopping community transmission as much as possible. Herd immunity and precision timing of control measures has not been used.

    The public must remain focused on basic hygiene measures – self isolating, washing of hands, social distancing and not be misled about how fast a vaccine can be developed, clinically tested and manufactured at scale. Similarly hopes/expectations should not be placed on novel treatments although research and trials do need supporting. The CSO, who comes from a background in Big Pharma research, must be seen to reflect the advice of SAGE in an objective way and resist the many difficult political and business pressures that surround the process. His experience with GSK should mean that he knows about the timescales for bringing a novel vaccine or new drugs safely to market.

    1. Local government and social care

    Local government (LAs) has been subject to year on year cuts and cost constraints since 2010, which have undermined their capability for the role now expected of them. The budget did not address this fundamental issue and we fully expect that in the crisis, central government will pass on the majority of local actions agreed at COBRA to them. During the national and international crisis LAs must be provided with the financial resources they need to build community hubs to support care in the community during this difficult time. The government need to support social care.

    COVID-19 is particularly dangerous to our older population and those with underlying health conditions. This means that the government needs to work energetically with the social care sector to ensure that the public health control measures are applied effectively but sensitively to this vulnerable population. The health protection measures which have been announced is an understandable attempt to protect vulnerable people but it will require community mobilisation to support these folk.

    Contingency plans need to be in place to support care and nursing homes when cases are identified and to ensure that they can call on medical and specialist nursing advice to manage cases who are judged not to require hospitalisation. They will also need to be prepared to take back people able to be discharged from acute hospital care to maintain capacity in the acute sector.

    Apart from older people in need there are also many people with long term conditions needing home based support services, which will become stressed during this crisis. There will be nursing and care staff sickness and already fragile support systems are at risk. As the retail sector starts to shut down and there is competition for scarce resources we need to be building in supply pathways for community based people with health and social care needs. Primary health care will need to find smart ways of providing medical and nursing support.

    1. The NHS

    In January and February when the gravity of the COVID pandemic was manifesting itself many of us were struck by the confident assertion that the NHS was well prepared. We know that the emergency plans will have been dusted down and the stockpile warehouses checked out. However, it now seems that there have not been the stress tests that you might have expected such as the supply and distribution of PPE equipment to both hospitals and community settings. The planning for COVID-19 testing also seems to have badly underestimated the need and we have been denied more accurate measures of community spread as well as the confirmation or otherwise of a definite case of COVID-19. This deficiency risks scarce NHS staff being quarantined at home for non COVID-19 symptoms.

    The 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic highlighted the need for critical care networks and more capacity in ITU provision with clear plans for surge capacity creating High Dependency Units (HDUs) including ability to use ventilators. The step-up and step-down facilities need bed capacity and adequate staffing. In addition, there is a need for clarity on referral pathways and ambulance transfer capability for those requiring even more specialised care such as Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO). The short window we now have needs to be used to sort some of these systems out and sadly the supply of critical equipment such as ventilators has not been addressed over the past 2 months. The Prime Minister at this point calls on F1 manufacturers to step in – we wasted 2 months.

    News of the private sector being drawn into the whole system is obviously good for adding beds, staff and equipment. The contracts need to be scrutinised in a more competent way than the Brexit cross channel ferries due diligence was, to ensure that the State and financially starved NHS is not disadvantaged. We prefer to see these changes as requisitioning private hospitals and contractors into the NHS. 

    1. Maintaining people’s standard of living

    We consider that the Chancellor has made some major steps toward ensuring that workers have some guarantees of sufficient income to maintain their health and wellbeing during this crisis. Clearly more work needs to be done to demonstrate that the self-employed and those on zero hours contracts are not more disadvantaged. The spotlight has shown that the levels of universal credit are quite inadequate to meet needs so now is the time to either introduce universal basic income or beef up the social security packages to provide a living wage. We also need to ensure that the homeless and rootless, those on the streets with chronic mental illness or substance misuse are catered for and we welcome the news that Sadiq Khan has requisitioned some hotels to provide hostel space. It has been good to see that the Trade Unions and TUC have been drawn into negotiations rather than ignored.

    In political terms we saw in 2008 that the State could nationalise high street banks. Now we see that the State can go much further and take over the commanding heights of the economy! Imagine if these announcements had been made, not by Rishi Sunak, but by John McDonnell! The media would have been in meltdown about the socialist take over!

    1. Conclusion

    At this stage of the pandemic we note with regret that the UK government did not act sooner to prepare for what is coming both in terms of public health measures as well as preparing the NHS and Local Government. It seems to the SHA that the government is playing catch up rather than being on the front foot. Many of the decisions have been rather late but we welcome the commitment to support the public health system, listen to independent voices in the scientific world through SAGE and to invest in the NHS. The country as a whole recognises the serious danger we are in and will help orchestrate the support and solidarity in the NHS and wider community. Perhaps a government of national unity should be created as we hear much of the WW2 experience. We need to have trust in the government to ensure that the people themselves benefit from these huge investment decisions.

    24th March 2020

    Comments Off on SHA COVID-19 Blog 2

    COVID-19 Pandemic

    The SHA wants to contribute to the tremendous national and international debate about controlling and mitigating the worst effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. We will base these thoughts through the lens of a socialist society, which advocated politically in the 1930s to create the NHS in the UK and for other socialist policies, which see the social determinants of health being as important as the provision of health and social care services as we strive for a healthier and fairer society.

    This blog will be the first of a series and will cover

     

    1. A global crisis
    2. The Public Health system
    3. The NHS, Local Government and Social Care
    4. Funding for staff and facilities
    5. Staff training, welfare and support
    6. Vulnerable populations
    7. Assuring Universal Basic Income

     

    1. A global crisis

    This COVID-19 pandemic has already been cited as the greatest public health crisis for at least a generation. The HIV/AIDS pandemic starting in the 1980s had a much slower spread between countries and is estimated to have caused an estimated 25-30m excess deaths so far.  The potential scale of this type of respiratory viral infection pandemic with a faster spread means we should probably look back to the 1957 Asian flu pandemic and indeed the 1918 post war ‘Spanish flu’. The 1918 pandemic led to an estimated 40-50m global deaths and was when there was also no effective vaccine or treatment for the new variant of flu. So basic public health hygiene (hand washing), identifying cases and quarantining (self isolation) are still important. We recognise this as a global challenge, which requires global solidarity and the sharing of knowledge/expertise and advice.

    The WHO, which is part of the United Nations, needs our support and is performing a very beneficial role.  This will be especially important for those Low Middle Income Countries (LMICs) who often have unstable political environments and weak public health and health systems. Remember the Democratic Republic of the Congo who have only just seen off their Ebola epidemic, war torn Syria and the Yemen.

    The USA and other high-income countries should be unambiguous about recognising this as a fundamental global pandemic requiring collaboration between countries along the principles of mutual aid. The UN and WHO need our support and funding and we look to international financial organisations such as the IMF/World Bank to rally around in the way that the world banking system showed they could in their own self inflicted 2008 financial crash. The WHO has recently referred to Europe as the epicentre of the pandemic and we urge the Government to put aside their ideological objections and co-operate fully with the EU and our European partners.

     

    1. The public health system

    The UK itself is in a relatively strong position with a national public health service, which has focus at a UK level (CMO/PHE), scientific advisory structures (SAGE), devolved governments, municipalities and local government. The NHS too still has national lines of control from NHSE to the NHS in England and the equivalents in devolved countries. The Tory ‘Lansley’ reforms in England destroyed the health authority structure below national levels (remember the former Strategic and District Health Authorities) but at least PHE has a regional organisation and Local Government have Directors of Public Health. We regret the fact that the 10 years of Tory austerity has depleted the resources in PHE and Local Government through not funding the PHE budget adequately and not honouring the public health grant for local authorities. We hope that the recent budget will mean that the public health service and local government does receive the financial and other resources required to help lead the pandemic response. Pandemics have always been high up in the UK risk register.

     

    1. The NHS, Local Government and Social Care

    We are grateful that despite the privatisation of many parts of the NHS in England we still have a recognisable system and a culture of service rather than profit within our one million or so staff and their NHS organisations. We were pleased to hear the open ended funding commitment from the Chancellor at the last budget and urge that leaders within the NHS in England and the devolved countries use this opportunity to try to mitigate the underfunding over the last 10 years and implement the emergency plans that exist and calibrate them to deal most effectively with this particular viral threat. Any debates about further privatisation of the NHS needs to be taken off the agenda and let’s not use the budget money to prop up the private sector but requisition capacity if that is what is needed and compensate usage on an NHS cost basis. We want to protect the NHS from the risk that the NHS Long Term Plan proposals for 44 Integrated Care Schemes opens up the risk of US styled private insurance schemes.

     

    1. Funding for staff and facilities.

    It will of course be difficult as a result of the staffing crisis that has been allowed to drift over the past 10 years with shortages of NHS workforce of 100,000 of which 40,000 are nurse vacancies but also includes doctors and other key staff. We and our Labour Party colleagues have been reminding Tory Ministers  that it takes 10 years to train a medical specialist so you cannot whistle them up or poach them from other poorer countries. The government needs to abolish their proposed points based immigration regime and indeed the compulsory NHS insurance of £650 per adult which is a huge disincentive to come here and work in the health and social care system.

    Hospitals and other health facilities in the UK take time to plan, build and commission. We can of course learn from Wuhan in China where they built a 1000 bedded hospital in weeks! Our own war preparation in the late 1930s when industry shifted production rapidly from civilian to military supplies is another exemplar. Despite the negative impact of 10 years of Tory austerity we urge the NHS to embrace this opportunity to invest in staff, supplies and facilities needed to manage the effects of the pandemic. Creating strategic regional NHS bodies will ensure that capital and revenue resources committed from the centre are used optimally and equitable to meet population needs in collaboration with local authorities.

     

    1. Staff training, welfare and support

    Front line NHS and social care staff will need our support over this time. We must ensure that working practices protect staff as much as possible from the risks in the workplace. Training and provision of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is vital and employment practices will need to adapt to the changing situation. Lets not forget social care workers, dentists, optometrists and district nurses who are part of our front line. Staff will need retraining if doctors and nurses are to be diverted to unfamiliar roles as we will need A&E, pandemic pods and intensive care unit capacity to be enhanced. Sadly, we now have a significant workforce who work for private contractors as part of the Tory privatisation of the NHS. We need to ensure that they have the same employment safeguards, minimum pay levels, sick pay and the health and safety entitlements as NHS staff. This is the time to renationalise such services back into the fold.

     Patients with existing long-term conditions remain in need of continuing care as will patients presenting with new life-threatening conditions such as cancers, diabetes and circulatory diseases. NHS managers will need support to organise these different services and decisions to postpone non-urgent elective surgery to free up resources. What also makes sense is testing novel ways of supporting people digitally and by teleconferencing to reduce attendance at NHS premises. This can be rolled out for Out Patient provision as well as GP surgeries. The NHS 111 service, and other online services  and the equivalents in the devolved nations can easily be overwhelmed so pushing out good health information and advice is being done and needs to continue. The public and patient engagement has always been at the heart of our policies and can be rolled out in this emergency utilising the third sector more imaginatively.

     

    1. Vulnerable populations.

    In our assessment of what needs to be done we must not bypass the urgent needs of some of our most vulnerable populations. The homeless and rootless populations, many of whom have longstanding mental health conditions and/or substance dependency, are particularly at risk. They need urgent attention working closely with the extensive voluntary sector. Also those populations with long term conditions who will feel at risk if services are withdrawn due to staff redeployment or staff sickness need planning for. Primary care needs to be the service we support to flag up those in need and ensure that their medications and personal care needs continue to be met even if we need to involve volunteers and good neighbours to help out with daily needs such as shopping/providing meals and other tasks.

    Undocumented workers such as migrants and refugees are often frightened to use health services for fear of police intrusion. The government needs to make it clear that there will be no barriers to care for this population during this crisis and beyond.

    Social care is in need of particular attention. It was virtually ignored in the budget. This sector is at risk in terms of problems with recruiting and retaining staff as well as the needs of the recipients of care and support.. While business continuity plans may be in place there is no question that this sector needs investment and generous support at the time of such an emergency. They will be a vital cog in the wheel alongside home-based carers in supporting the NHS and wider social care system. Those most at risk seem to be the most neglected. Disabled people with care needs have received little advice and no support. Already carers are going off sick and can be replaced only with great difficulty. Those paying for their own care with Direct Payments seem to get no support at all.

    With the COVID-19 virus we are seeing that the older population and those with so called ‘underlying conditions’ are at particular risk. We must ensure that this large population do not feel stigmatised and become isolated. Rapid assembly of local support groups should be encouraged which has been referred to as ‘local COBRA groups’. Local government can play a key role in establishing local neighbourhood centres for information and advice on accessing support as we move toward increasing quarantining and isolated households. Again wherever possible the use of IT and telephone connectivity to share information and provide remote support will make this more manageable.

     

    1. Assuring universal basic income.

    Finally the SHA recognises that the economy will be damaged by the pandemic, organisations will go to the wall and staff will lose their jobs and income stream. We have always recognised that the fundamental inequalities arise from the lack of income, adequate housing and the means to provide for everyday life. This pandemic will last for months and we think that the Government needs to ensure that we have systems in place to ensure that every citizen has access to an adequate income through this crisis. We pay particular attention to the 2m part time workers and those on zero hours contracts as well as the 5m self-employed. There have been welcome changes in the timely access to the insufficient Statutory Sick Pay but this is not going to be the answer. People will be losing their jobs as different parts of the economy go under as we are already seeing with aviation, the retail sector and café/restaurants. The government needs to reassure those fearful of losing their jobs that they will stand by them during the pandemic. It may be the time to test the Universal Basic Income concept to give all citizens a guarantee that they will have enough income for healthy living. We already have unacceptable health inequalities so we must not allow this to get worse.

     

    1. Conclusion

    The SHA stands ready to support the national and international efforts to tackle this pandemic. We assert our belief that a socialist approach sees universal health and social care as an essential part of society. That these systems should be funded by all according to a progressive taxation system and meet peoples needs being free at the point of use.  We believe that a thriving state owned and operated NHS and a complimentary not for profit care sector is essential to achieve a situation where rich and poor, young and old and citizens in towns, cities and in rural areas have equal access to the best care.

    We recognise that the social determinants of health underpin our health. We agree with Marmot who reminds us that health and wellbeing is reflected by ‘the conditions that people are born, grow, live, work and age and by the inequities in power, money and resources that influence these conditions’.

    The pandemic is global and is a major threat to people’s health and wellbeing. Universal health and public health services offer the best means of meeting this challenge nationally and globally. Populism and inward looking nationalism needs to be challenged as we work to reduce the human suffering that is unfolding and direct resources to meet the needs of the people at this time.

    On behalf of officers and vice chairs

    Comments Off on SHA COVID-19 Blog 1

    The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Boston is the most important yearly scientific meeting for HIV doctors and the global community of people living with HIV.

    However, this year – and at the very last minute because of the new coronavirus outbreak – the organisers replaced it with a ‘virtual’ conference.

    HIV i-Base, the London-based HIV Treatment Information charity, regularly attends this conference. Simon Collins and Polly Clayden at i-Base always report on the latest scientific research, including on new drugs for both treatment and prevention of HIV.

    But importantly his year, CROI have given open access to a special session on COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2.

    Here is Simon Collins’ report for i-Base. This includes a link to the special session which contains up-to-date information about the outbreak that can be of interest to all, and not just to people who are HIV positive:

    The special session on coronavirus at CROI yesterday is posted for open-access on the CROI website. [1]

    The 75-minute overview includes four talks and a Q&A at the end.

    A few selected key points include:

    • The highest risk of more serious illness and outcomes (risk of dying) are older age (80>70>60 years old), and having other health conditions (heart, lung/breathing, diabetes, cancer). The risk of the most serious outcomes is 5 to 30 times higher than with seasonal influenza (‘flu’).
    • Implications for people living with HIV are not currently known, other than as for the general population. One speaker included low CD4 as a possible caution. [Note: Due to lack of evidence so far a low CD4 count has not been included as a risk in the recent UK (BHIVA) statement]. [2]
    • Transmission is largely from microdroplets in air from someone during the infectious period (generally from 1 day before symptoms to average 5 days, but up to 14 days after). These can remain infectious on hard surfaces for an unknown time (possibly hours) which is why hand-washing and not touching your face is important.
    • Best ways to minimise risk of infection include washing your hands more carefully and frequently and not touching your face.
    • Soap and water is better than hand sanitisers (and more readily available).
    • Best candidate treatment (so far) is remdesivir (a Gilead compound). This has good activity against a range of viruses in in-vitro studies and is already in at least four large randomised studies.
    • Studies with candidate vaccines are expected shortly – within two months of the virus being isolated – fastest time for vaccine development.
    • The response in China after the first cases were reported was probably much faster than it would have been in the UK. This included:
      –  Within four days of the first reported cases, the suspect source was identified and closed (a seafood market).
      –  Within a week, the new virus was identified (SARS-CoV-2).
      –  The viral sequence was then shared with WHO and on databases in the public domain for other global scientists to use.
      –  Within three weeks of the first confirmed cases, Wuhan and 15 other large cities in China were shut down as part of containment measures.
    • One of the questions after the main talks asked whether SARS was now extinct. The answer explained that SARS is a bat virus, and only 50 out of about 1300 species of bats have been studied so far. So SARS is very likely still around.

    COMMENT

    Currently, the most important things for people living with HIV are:

    1. To make sure people have enough medications – including at least one month spare. If travelling where there might be a risk of quarantine, to take additional meds with you to cover this.

    2. As recommended by BHIVA, sensible hygiene precautions (hand washing and not touching your face etc). [2]

    3. Avoid or delay any non-essential or non-urgent hospital visits.

    4. Special caution for those who are older or who have multimorbidities – which are prevalent in HIV.

    References

    1. Special session on COVID-19. CROI 2020, 8–11 March 2020.
      https://special.croi.capitalreach.com
    2. BHIVA. Comment on COVID-19 from the British HIV Association. 27 February 2020.
      https://www.bhiva.org/comment-on-COVID-19-from-BHIVA
    Comments Off on CROI 2020: Special session on COVID-19

    “Like everyone else, we feel helplessness, anxiety, and fear.”

    by Dan Robitzski / 8 hours ago

    As they try to fight the COVID-19 outbreak, medical staff in China are suffering from the seemingly endless slog of work, new cases, and the coronavirus itself.

    Nurses in Wuhan, the city where the outbreak began, are fainting on the job, developing painful rashes, sores, hypoglycemia, and psychological exhaustion — and that’s why two of them published an impassioned plea for help from the rest of the world in the journal The Lancet on Sunday.

    “While we are professional nurses, we are also human. Like everyone else, we feel helplessness, anxiety, and fear,” the authors, Yingchun Zeng and Yan Zhen, both from hospitals in Guangzhou, wrote. “Experienced nurses occasionally find the time to comfort colleagues and try to relieve our anxiety. But even experienced nurses may also cry, possibly because we do not know how long we need to stay here and we are the highest-risk group for COVID-19 infection.”

    Nearly 2,000 medical workers helping COVID-19 patients in China have been infected, and at least nine have died. Meanwhile, the nurses write that the safety measures they have to follow, like quadruple-layering gloves and constantly wearing and washing tight respirators that are giving them bedsores, are simultaneously making them sick and rendering them useless as caregivers.

    For instance, unpackaging medical supplies and giving a patient a shot while wearing four layers of latex gloves is particularly difficult.

    “Due to an extreme shortage of health-care professionals in Wuhan, 14,000 nurses from across China have voluntarily come to Wuhan to support local medical health-care professionals,” the nurses wrote. “But we need much more help. We are asking nurses and medical staff from countries around the world to come to China now, to help us in this battle.”

     

     

     

    1 Comment

    Today the Mail on Sunday published an article headlined ‘HIV treatment now costs NHS as much as breast cancer – Fears £606m annual bill for sexually transmitted disease is fuelled by flood of foreign health tourists‘.

    The only views to ‘balance’ the diatribe published in the paper and online was a short rebuttal from BHIVA  (British HIV Association) and NAT (National AIDS Trust) as well as a short statement from NHS England on how costs for HIV treatment are actually reducing:

    A spokesman for the BHIVA said: ‘In the UK, new diagnoses of HIV are now falling because of the success of testing and treatment.’

    An NHS England spokesman said the cost of HIV treatment had fallen £28 million from £634 million in 2017/18 to £606 million in 2018/19.

    A Department of Health spokesman said: ‘We’ve seen a decline of almost a third in new HIV diagnoses in the UK in recent years.

    ‘As with all other serious infectious diseases, we do not charge overseas visitors for treatment for HIV as, if left untreated, there is a significant risk to others in this country.’

    Deborah Gold, chief executive of the NAT, said: ‘The concept of health tourism for HIV treatment is an outdated myth.

    ‘It is actually a problem that we have such long average delays, usually years, between migrants’ arrival in the UK and them accessing HIV testing and care.

    ‘Universal availability of HIV treatment is a cornerstone of the response in the UK. Any suggestion this is a poor use of NHS money, or that access to treatment should be limited for anyone, is outrageous. In fact, it is evidence of the NHS at its best: saving lives and preventing ill-health.’

    UK-CAB (the UK Community Advisory Board) responded to the article via this tweet with the following statement:

    “The UK is a world leader in reducing the numbers of new HIV diagnoses and one of only six countries to have already met the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets. This achievement would not have been possible without upscaling HIV testing and providing immediate antiretroviral treatment to all people living with HIV in the UK.

    People with HIV on effective antiretroviral treatment cannot pass the virus on to their sexual partners or to their unborn child during birth and pregnancy. The investment in free HIV treatment for everyone with HIV is fundamental to meeting the Government’s commitment to end new transmissions by 2030.

    Stigmatising information like that reported in today’s Mail on Sunday only serves to hinder the UK’s response to the HIV epidemic. Whilst we have made huge strides in reducing new diagnoses by an incredible 28% between 2015 and 2017, the numbers of people diagnosed late is still too high.

    Late diagnosis not only increases the chances of premature death but also heightens the risk of HIV being unknowingly transmitted to sexual partners. We cannot tolerate attitudes which put people off testing and finding out their HIV status.

    People living with HIV should not be pitted against other patient groups or conditions.

    Access to treatment and care for all people living with HIV ensures that individuals can live well and in good health and also stops transmission of the virus to others. Any insinuation that denying HIV treatment to those without ‘settled’ status would be a benefit to the nation’s public health or NHS budgets is nonsense.”

    Please circulate this as widely as possible.

    1 Comment

    Nick Bostock reports at GPonline that:

    Under-pressure GPs are delivering ‘remarkable outcomes’ on cancer

    You can read the complete article here. Nick reports:

    GPs ‘can take a lot of credit’ for marked improvements in early cancer diagnosis and reductions in the proportion of cases detected as an emergency, according to a cancer expert.

    In the year to March 2018, the proportion of cancer patients who first presented at hospital as an emergency fell to 18.8% – down from 21% in the year to December 2012.

    Over roughly the same period, cancers detected at an early stage increased significantly – rising from 46% in 2013 to 52% by mid-2017, according to figures from the National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN).

    However: GPonline reported earlier this year on research showing that GPs were as good as consultants at making appropriate use of cancer diagnostic tests – and yet pledges to give GPs direct access to four key diagnostic tests – blood tests, chest X-ray, ultrasound and endoscopy – have not been delivered in many areas.

    Isn’t it about time that GPs were also given access to the new technology for GP consultations via mobile and Skype? This is currently being ‘rolled out’ by GP at Hand. Here’s a transcript of the R4 Today programme 13 September at 6 mins to 9:00 am (I made this transcript and I believe it’s a fairly accurate job – but any mistakes are mine):

    (Int) Interviewer

    AP (Ali Parsa, CEO Babylon – parent company that runs GP at Hand)

    RV (Dr Richard Vautrey, Chair GP Committee, British Medical Association)

    SoS = Secretary of State

     

    (Int): So Ali Parsa just explain to us how your App works.

    (AP): So, we have a very simple service. So, what it does is allow patients to check their symptoms whenever they want. To make an appointment with a doctor within seconds, to be able to see a doctor within minutes. In fact, I was just checking my App and it says that if I want to see a doctor I can see one at 9 o’clock today, in the next few minutes.

    (Int): You mean ‘see’ over the phone?

    (AP): Over the phone. And if you want to see somebody physically then, you can go see them that very same day. It is open 24hrs a day, 365 days of the year. And it is available for the same price the National Health Service pays any other GP. What we have done is to solve the problem of accessibility and the continuity of healthcare – using technology and what the SoS and the NHS is doing today is celebrating that and promising it for the whole country.

    (Int): And Richard Vautrey, this is something which patients complain about again and again, isn’t it, access to their GP, so is this kind of App the solution?

    (RV): We have real concerns, as well as patients do, about the inability of many practices to be able to offer enough appointments and that’s simply because we haven’t had the funding over the last decade to support the expansion of the health service to be able to meet the growing needs of our patients. What General Practices are doing right now is seeing thousands and thousands – if not a million – patients today offering, you know, face-to-face consultations and seeing them in their surgeries, so that’s when patients approach them today. So that’s happening right now. What we haven’t got is the resources to be able to offer some of the IT technologies in every single practice. And the SoS’s commitment to IT is welcome, but we need to see that commitment translated into resources provided to enable every practice to offer this type of consultation.

    (Int): But could this kind of technological approach actually help some of the pressure on GPs because people would consult a doctor over the phone rather than going to the surgery.

    (AP): Well many practices, if not most practices, already offer telephone consultations. What they haven’t got is the IT kit to be able to offer smart phone consultations, or Skype-phone computer consultations, any many would like to be able to do that, if the technology was provided to them. But the other big difference is that every Practice that is open today will see any and every patient who lives within their area, and we have concerns about the model of which GP Hand has been built, which is primarily about looking at some of the relatively mobile healthy patients and not accepting every single patient who lives within their area.

    (AP): I’m afraid Richard that is simply factually not true. We will ask when patients started the service, to ask patients to seek advice if they want to change their GP Practice to our Practice, if they have any clinical issues. Most patients seek advice and join us – we look after them, young, old, sick, healthy, our patients are across the border, and we don’t do that just in Britain, remember we look after one third of the population in Rwanda, and we do so in the United States, we do this in Canada. . .

    (Int): But specifically, on this idea of whether you cherry pick patients, it’s likely that patients who don’t have very serious health problems, and maybe younger, are more likely to want to use an App on their mobile.

    (AP) . . . but, why is that? If the patient is not very mobile, if the patient is very old, if the patient can’t wait a few weeks to see their GP, they’re significantly more likely to use a service that is continuously available. Many of our patients have mental health issues – they can’t wait for a few days or a few weeks to see their GP. That’s why they switch to us. A thousand patients today will choose to apply to GP at Hand, and then switch their GP Practice – one every three minutes.

    (Int): Richard Vautrey, some GP Practices are worried about the fact that if their patients sign up to GP at Hand they then lose that funding, don’t they?

    (RV): That’s exactly right. And the way that General Practice is funded at the moment is a balanced mechanism, so those patients who use the service less, and there are many patients that use the service more, and that overall, that compensates one for another. What we have concerns about is that this would effectively replace a personal service with an anonymous call centre and patients don’t want that.

    (Int): And finally, Ali Parsa, this was something that commissioning groups in Birmingham were worried about and that was clinical safety – isn’t it better to see a doctor the next day.

    (AP): No, it wasn’t clinical safety, you do see a doctor, not a call centre, face-to-face on your mobile and then see one in one of our surgeries. We will open up across the country physical surgeries, their issue was not that. It was an IT hitch that doesn’t allow its screening to be done with your local hospital and that IT hitch has been fixed. This is the future, and I encourage more and more patients to join it.

    (Int): Okay thank you both, we’ll leave it there, let us know what your think via twitter.

    Comments Off on Under-pressure GPs are delivering ‘remarkable outcomes’ on cancer