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Author Archives: Joe Farrington-Douglas

Labour may have lost the election but much of its health Manifesto is being implemented by the Conservative Government. David Cameron and Jeremy Hunt are sticking to their centrist, “glazier” strategy (at least in hospital land) with market plans conspicuously side-lined. While they need to make further changes to tramp the dirt down on the toxifying Lansley legacy, economic policy is now the NHS’s greatest threat. Simon Stevens told the CBI that “The era of go-it-alone individual hospitals is now being superceded by more integrated care partnerships” – the very argument pursued by Labour in opposition to the Health and […]
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The UK has a relatively cheap, efficient health system, fairly funded and provided. It also has a cheap, inefficient and deeply unfair social care system. But despite their frugality, the health and care system is entering another financial crisis prompting zombie calls for charges, private insurance and rationing. Whilst avoiding these traps, we should consider whether a progressive funding reform could set the NHS on a more sustainable footing despite the austere climate. In particular, we should look at the options for pre-funding health and care so that future generations of older users and patients can enjoy longevity without the […]
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The current smog – whilst unnerving for those living through it – is a welcome opportunity to focus on an under-reported scandal of modern British public health. We are being killed, silently and invisibly in the thousands, by the air we breathe. And few in Public Health, let alone the media, is noticing. Why? The mainstream narrative on public health this century revolves around behaviour and chronic disease. The major health challenges were tackled by the Victorians and the social reforms of the 20th Century. First sewerage and water, through factory acts and public housing, then lately the clean air […]
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I just want to be part of a club of Labour members who are interested in health policy and can organise and take part in discussions, debates and campaigns. I do not think the SHA needs to, or should try to have “a policy” – least of all a policy that 75% of a group agrees to. Why? We don’t have any executive powers, and no one outside our own circle is interested in what our policy is. The “policy” that I am interested in debating is the policy of the Labour party. Individuals who join the SHA can take […]
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