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Author Archives: Jim Gralton

The life long member of the Socialist Health Association, Dr Julian Tudor Hart died on July 1st 2018. The following is the funeral tribute paid to him by Dr Brian Gibbons who worked with Julian in the Upper Afan Valley Group Practice  in south Wales. ========================================================================================= There is no great forest that is made up of a single tree, no great river made from a single tributary or no great mountain range with single peak. And as we come here to remember and commemorate the life of Julian Tudor Hart—we realise what a multi-faceted individual he was. He embraced and […]
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The Welsh Government has announced its intention to increase Welsh GP training positions by  a further 18%. This follows a significant increase in the fill rate for training posts, which this year has already seen 155 places already filled against the target of 136.g The Health Minister, Vaughan Gething, has now asked Health Education and Improvement Wales (HEIW) to review the number of places in Wales to ensure a skilled workforce is in place to meet the aims of A Healthier Wales to provide care closer to home and reduce pressure on hospitals. The target fill rate for GP training […]
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Further investment in Welsh general practice  has been promised  following negotiations for the 2019-20 General Medical Services (GMS) contract – which is worth over £536.6m. Additional funding will also be made available this year to cover the rising costs of pensions, following changes made by the UK government according to the press released from the Welsh Government. The funding will mean an increase per patient in Wales from the current contract, from £86.75 to £90. The new value per patient is also more than offered in England. The contract reforms the way in which services operate with a much stronger […]
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It is over 40 years since the Alma-Ata Declaration asserted the crucial role of primary care in the promotion of the health of people world wide. Since then global health policy has attempted to give effect to the Declaration with varying levels of success. The situation has been no different in Wales. The Wanless Review in 2003 re-emphasised this message. It stated “ …(t)he current configuration of health services places an insupportable burden on the acute sector and its workforce. This is the most expensive part of the system … (t)he primary care sector in turn is not sufficiently resourced […]
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DELIVERED AT JULIAN HART’S FUNERAL — JUNE 16th 2018   Julian and I were chatting once about heaven and hell, as you do. He didn’t believe in either, but supposing he was wrong, he thought he might be allowed into heaven, not as a believer, you understand, but for good behaviour. Julian always wanted to be a doctor in a mining village, partly because his father had been a colliery doctor in Llanelli; partly it was the romance of mining practice as popularised in AJ Cronin ‘s novel The Citadel; but mainly it was the sort of community to which […]
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In the two decades since the publication of the Sutherland Royal Commission report on long-term care the issues around the cost of caring for an ageing population remains one of the major issues in public policy. And we remain no nearer to its resolution. While varying elements of catering for long-term care remain the responsibility of the UK Government, devolution has allowed a fair level innovation and diversity in approach including the introduction of free personal care in Scotland which was one of the main recommendations of the Sutherland Commission. In Wales the National Assembly’s Finance Committee has recently published […]
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The National Assembly’s Finance Committee is undertaking an inquiry into the costs of care for older people. This is timely not least because the UK Government has promised us a green paper on social care finance by the summer 2018  thought there are media reports this could be postponed — it seems that the Brexit policy paralysis is contagious and spreading to other other areas. No doubt in advance of the the anticipated green paper, there has been a flurry of papers and publications in recent weeks. They will add to the dozen or so commissions, green papers etc that […]
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In 2009 the internal market was abolished in the Welsh NHS. Seven unified Health Boards (and three trusts – Ambulance, Public Health and Velindre cancer services) took over the responsibility of the former 22 Local Health Boards and most of functions of the seven Trusts to both plan and deliver health care for the population resident in their geographical areas. In the initial phase following the internal market abolition the acute hospital sector seemed to have “captured” the planning process. But as things have matured the Welsh Government has sought to re-balance matters with the introduction of Integrated Medium Term […]
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Deborah Harrington’s interesting posting on “The Myths and Legends of Hypothecated National Insurance” (March 29 2018) in particularly relevant in the light of media speculation about hypothecated taxes or National Insurance contributions to pay for health or social care. In Wales there is a further variation on this general theme with Professor Gerry Holtham (Dept. of Regional Economics at Cardiff Metropolitan University ) proposing the establishment a social care levy for Wales. (See link below) The levy, based on weekly payments between £1.75 and £7, would differ from a tax in that the receipts would not go into a general […]
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The interim Parliamentary Review, published in July 2017, observed the the Welsh NHS and social care has been subject to many well-considered reviews since devolution. They all shared the common fate of not to achieving transformational change as they never successfully made the transition from the page to the front line. In an attempt to address this it recommended that Welsh health and care services should concentrate on a limited number of significant innovations, evaluate the outcomes and implement the most successful ones with a sense of urgency. Despite this the Final Report (January 2018) itself produces ten “high level”recommendation […]
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The interim report on the Parliamentary Review on the Welsh Health and Social Care Service was published in July 2017 just before the National Assembly’s summer recess. Its main message was that both services needed to innovate and modernise at a much faster rate if they are to continue to provide quality care over the next five to ten years. This is a well rehearsed and often repeated message. However, unlike previously, instead of encouraging “a thousand flowers to bloom”, the Review urges more limited and strategic approaches with a particular emphasis on the needs of the older population. These […]
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Wales was the first health service in the UK to abolish prescription charges in 2007.  The NHS in Scotland and Northern Ireland subsequently adopted the policy. The following article, written by Welsh Cabinet Secretary for Health Vaughan Gething, initally appeared in the Western Mail newspaper:-     This weekend we marked the 10th anniversary of free prescriptions being available in Wales.   When we took the decision to abolish prescription charges back in 2007 it was in light of evidence that some people with serious chronic conditions, such as high blood pressure or heart disease, could not afford their prescriptions […]
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