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Author Archives: Jean Smith

Abdallah al-Qutati: Family and colleagues of third paramedic killed in Gaza speak out 17 August 2018 In Medical Aid for Palestinians (MAP)’s latest film, the family, colleagues and friends of 22-year-old first responder Abdallah al-Qutati, who was shot dead by Israeli forces last week, speak out about the circumstances of his killing and their demands for protection and accountability. Abdallah was the third health worker to be killed in Gaza since 30 March. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Abdallah was volunteering with a team called ‘Nabd Al-Hayat’ (Life’s Pulse), providing first aid treatment and evacuation for injured demonstrators. […]
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National Health Service (Co-Funding and Co-Payment) Bill 2017-19 Type of Bill:          Private Members’ Bill (Presentation Bill) Sponsor:          Mr Christopher Chope Progress of a Bill House of Commons First reading, Second reading, Committee stage, Report stage, Third reading House of Lords First reading, Second reading, Committee stage, Report stage, Third reading Consideration of the Amendments Royal Assent This Bill is expected to have its second reading debate on Friday 26 October 2018. This Bill was presented to Parliament on Tuesday 5 September 2017. This is known as the first reading and there was no debate on the […]
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Obesophobia Posted: 16 Aug 2018 11:27 PM PDT In 1976, we ate more than we do today. So why are we fatter? By George Monbiot, published in the Guardian 15thAugust 2018 When I saw the photo, I could scarcely believe it was the same country. The picture of Brighton Beach in 1976  featured in the Guardian a few weeks ago appeared to show an alien race. Almost everyone was slim. I mentioned it on social media, then went on holiday. When I returned, I found that people were still debating it. The heated discussion prompted me to read more. How […]
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Principles for a National Health Service One of the Centre’s friends, Jack Czauderna, recently shared this with us: Dr Julian Tudor Hart, who has recently died, was a pioneering GP who inspired generations of health workers. He coined the term Inverse Care Law in 1971 which asserts: “The availability of good medical care tends to vary inversely with the need of the population served. This inverse care law operates more completely where medical care is most exposed to market forces, and less so where such exposure is reduced.” Here are his 9 distinctive and essential characteristics of a National Health […]
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LATEST figures on A&E waiting times reveal the “astonishing” collapse in NHS standards under Theresa May, Labour said today. Monthly statistics for July 2018 published by NHS England show that just 89.3 per cent of people attending A&E were seen within four hours, well below the 95 per cent target. That dismal performance means NHS England has consistently failed to meet the 95 per cent four-hour target — lowered from 98 per cent by the coalition government — since July 2015. The number of people attending A&E in July 2018 also hit a record 2.176 million people in July 2018, […]
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The Commonwealth Fund The Issue How medical practices are organized and structured keeps changing. But as more practices merge and more physicians sell their practices to hospitals, we don’t have a good understanding of whether, and how, these factors affect the quality and cost of health care. Using 2012–2013 data from the National Study of Physician Organizations linked with Medicare claims, Commonwealth Fund–supported researchers writing in Health Services Research (July 5, 2018) examined how the size of a practice, along with other characteristics, relate to the total amount spent on a patient’s care and the quality of care provided. Quality was […]
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New BMA poll show nine out of ten doctors regard latest government pay award as “unacceptable” A BMA poll of more than 12,000 doctors in England shows that nine out of ten regard the recent pay offer from the government as unacceptable, while a similar number believe that their morale has worsened in the wake of the announcement. The BMA received responses from 12, 717 doctors to its survey asking for their opinion on the pay uplifts for doctors in England which were published in July 2018. In making the award, the government ignored the recommendations of the independent review […]
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Consultation events in Birmingham, Exeter, Leeds, London on government plans for dismantling England’s NHS https://www.events.england.nhs.uk/search/30/Icps

Radical Statistics  (Radstats):  2019 Annual Conference & AGM Liverpool:  Saturday  23  February  2019 Inequalities  and  the  Life-course  – the  Impact  of  Austerity  across  Generations Key questions for this conference include: How do inequalities affect life chances?  What effect has austerity had on inequalities across generations?     Does austerity affect younger cohorts differently than older ones? How does this differ across social groups, class, gender, etc.?  How to measure inequalities across the life-course?    What data exists; what is needed?

I’ve spent the last two months working on our contact lists so we can comply with the General Data Protection Regulations. I contacted most of the 36,000 people on our database.  That reduced the number to around 31,000.  Some people wanted to leave our database, many emails bounced, but 1300 wanted to stay on our list.  This gives us an opportunity to build a relationship with those people.  It isn’t very clear how the new rules apply to an organisation like the SHA.  They are concerned with marketting and the protection of personal information.   The vast majority of the contacts on […]
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The introduction of Accountable Care Organisations – or whatever they are called this week – brings a lot of talk not only about integrating health and social care, but also about local accountability.  The accountability seems to be more about accountants than about democracy, but in principle local elected councillors could have a voice in the working of health services  which they haven’t had for many years.  We asked our members how health had featured in their local election campaiogns. Of course we were looking mostly at how local Labour parties dealt with health – but some of our members […]
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The association has been affiliated to the Labour Party nationally since at least 1934, when our President, Somerville Hastings, the first doctor to appear at a Labour Party Conference, proposed the resolution which committed the Party to establish a free National Health Service. We are one of 20 affiliated socialist societies. We are entitled to send two delegates to the Labour Party national conference, and one delegate to the Women’s and Youth conference. Although we do not require all our members to be in the Labour Party any delegates to any party bodies must be party members, and live in […]
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