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Author Archives: James Angove

Advanced paramedics in England will be able to prescribe medicines to people who do not need hospital treatment, under new laws starting on Sunday.  Who will be able to prescribe? Advanced Paramedics  – those undertaking or having completed a Master’s-level (Level 7) qualification – will be allowed to complete a prescribing module, if their employed role has a need for it (i.e. you must be employed in a prescribing role, e.g. in a GP surgery. An AP cannot complete it if employed in a standard frontline paramedic role where prescribing is not a required qualification). How does this fit with […]
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Every winter, the crisis of care deepens. Here we are, in the eye of the storm, with the contradictions glaring out from the abyss. 10+ hour waits at A&E, causing countless unreported harms in delayed treatment. It’s upsetting to think soon, someone is likely to die in the corridor, just as last year (The Guardian, 2017) The infamous Corridor is usually where patients are taken by Ambulance when they are unable or unsafe to walk (e.g. the bedbound, the nursing home resident) or when their condition requires continual assessment & management (e.g. amber-flag sepsis, breathing difficulties on oxygen etc.), but […]
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A socialist analysis of any health programme requires recognition of the competing tensions of resource, patient care and working conditions, and the necessity of balance to prevent a crisis. Therefore, the following analysis will reflect these tensions. Finally, I will analyse the crisis points which caused this to be necessary. During this analysis, I will exclude increased funding as a consideration, due to the low liklihood under the current government, and because increased funding would ameliorate, but not solve, some of the underlying problems. The Ambulance Response Programme The Ambulance Response Programme was the largest overhaul of the way the […]
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Demand has grown for the Ambulance Services by 35% since 2010. While the government announce that the budget has seen a 16% increase in budget since 2010 (National Audit Office, 2017), in reality matching inflation counts for 12% of this increase. This demand is not predominantly the ‘living longer effect’: while that of course does play a part, aging is largely a predictable variable and with effective planning could have been corrected for many years ago. The increase in demand comes largely from four areas: undifferentiated urgent care complaints; failed secondary care; mental health problems; and social care problems. All […]
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