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Author Archives: Colin Leys

The debate about social care funding during the 2017 General election was one of the many oddities of the campaign.  Not only did the furore about the “dementia tax” u-turn potentially undermine the Prime Minister’s offering to older voters and her overall credibility, it also revealed a media almost entirely ignorant of the harsh reality which local authorities, older people and their families now face as a result of current national social care policy. In addition, none of the 3 main parties even came close to recognising this in their manifestos or to providing anything approaching a solution. The excessive […]
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Election Briefing Note May 2017 Summary The current amount of public expenditure on social care for older people in England each year is less than 0.5% of GDP. To put this in context, the UK currently spends around 2% of GDP on armaments and defence and 0.7% of GDP on foreign aid. The manifesto commitments of all the 3 major parties on social care mean that publicly-funded social care will remain highly rationed over the next 5 years and will only be available to those older people with the most substantial care needs. It is unclear whether the spending commitments […]
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The Health and Social Care Act is a zombie – a dead concept that NHS England is obliged to work around NHS England’s Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP) project is an attempt to answer two major problems. One is to find ways to do without the £22 billion a year that the NHS, as it presently   operates, will need to cut by 2020-21 (and post-Brexit the gap may of course be much larger). Britain already spends 1% less of its Gross Domestic Product (equivalent to about £20 billion a year) on health than France, Germany and other comparable European neighbours, […]
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Predictions that the NHS is facing disaster have been issued so often that people no longer pay much attention. This time there is unanimity. Even normally government friendly experts are in agreement, and for good reasons. Since 2010 the NHS budget has been almost static, while the UK population has increased by two and a half million and is predicted to grow by 440,000 a year over the next ten years, with a growing proportion living longer and having more longterm illnesses.  So it is no surprise that NHS hospitals in England look likely to have overspent their 2015-16 budgets […]
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