While we welcome the £5bn emergency fund for the NHS and other public services and the open ended commitment made by the Chancellor that the government will provide whatever the NHS needs to meet the challenge of COVID-19; we are concerned to point out three big issues on sustaining an NHS, social care and protecting all workers including those in the gig economy.

The Chancellor re-iterated the discredited election manifesto statements about 50,000 more nurses while we know that there are already 43,000  funded nurse vacancies. He repeated the mantra about 50 million more GP appointments while recruitment of young doctors to become GPs remains poor and it is not clear how this can be achieved in the short term. He reiterated the discredited election slogan about 40 new hospitals. Both staffing promises ignore the fact that it is not only money that is needed – the legacy of austerity cannot be reversed by a cash injection alone – training a GP/medical specialist takes 10 years. Turn the tap off for 10 years and turn it back on expecting accolades is not good enough.

We are very concerned too about the immigration health surcharge, which is being increased to £624 per person. The NHS needs to continue to ethically attract health workers into our country for training and service. The surcharge will apply to EU citizens from January next year. This health surcharge is a serious disincentive and opens another pathway for Tories to introduce insurance charging into the NHS. The cost of collection as with all insurance schemes will be prohibitive.

Social care has been ignored. Everyone involved knows that we should be investing in health and social services and even Jeremy Hunt who presided over NHS austerity is on record as saying that this is a glaring omission in the budget. You need to invest in health and social care and the budget is silent on social care. The budget statement of 8,700 words mentions social care twice only and the manifesto commitment of £1bn/year for 5 years seems to have been lost. Local government leadership role has been ignored such as their role in housing, childcare and social support in communities. The attention given to cars, roads, potholes, red diesel and fuel tax does not signal that the other existential emergency on climate change is being addressed.

Finally we welcome the steps taken to move entitlement to SSP to day one but worry that the 111 service is already over stretched and should not have the burden of certification forced on them. The health and wellbeing of those who are not eligible for SSP, such as the estimated 2m part time and zero hours workers and the 5m self-employed is inadequately protected: the ESA is probably too small a compensation. Many will feel they have to continue to work, putting their own health and that of their families at risk.

The SHA campaigns for health and social services to be free at the point of need and to be funded by general taxation. We know that the 10 years of Tory austerity has damaged the fabric of our NHS and we need to invest in capital and training of staff with confidence in long term growth and sustainability. In a modern society the social care services need to be an integral part of our system and should be planned together with joint investment. This budget has missed an opportunity to make this change.

 

On behalf of the Officers and Vice Chairs

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One Comment

  1. The SHA should be fully aware that many workers are affected by Universal Credit. It is not a question of them being unable to claim inadequate levels of ESA or sick pay if they are impacted by COVID-19- many would be obliged to wait weeks for Universal Credit with dreadful consequences.

    Rebecca Long-Bailey MP has made a brilliant response to the budget- sharing pertinent and accurate articles from Tribune. The SHA may have missed the chance to nominate the modern candidate, but it could learn a lot from what she reads.

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